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King Richard III? World's first image of Grey Friars skull unveiled

Date:
February 4, 2013
Source:
University of Leicester
Summary:
Did this head once bear the English Crown? Researchers have just unveiled the world's first photograph of the human remains found at the Grey Friars church -- which could be that of King Richard III.

The skull of the skeleton found at the Grey Friars excavation in Leicester, potentially that of King Richard III.
Credit: University of Leicester

Did this head once bear the English Crown?

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The University of Leicester, with Channel 4, has just unveiled the world's first photograph of the human remains found at the Grey Friars church -- which could be that of King Richard III.

The image is released in advance of the University of Leicester's major announcement detailing the results of its investigations into the skeleton's identity on February 4.

The image displays the shape of the Grey Friars skeleton's skull. The University has investigated the skull for signs of damage to the back of the head -- potentially caused by battle injuries.

The University has released the image after months of skeletal analysis by Dr Jo Appleby, Lecturer in Human Bioarchaeology in the University's School of Archaeology and Ancient History, who led the exhumation of the remains in September 2012.

Dr Appleby said: "The skull was in good condition, although fragile, and was able to give us detailed information about this individual. It has been CT scanned at high resolution in order to allow us to investigate interesting features in as much detail as possible.

"In order to determine whether this individual is Richard III we have built up a biological profile of its characteristics. We have also carefully examined the skeleton for traces of a violent death."

The remains were found at the place where Richard III is believed to have been buried after his death at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.

The skeleton showed evidence of what was believed to be scoliosis and battle trauma -signs that suggest it may be the remains of the medieval monarch.

The University will announce the results of its rigorous scientific investigations in front of over 140 journalists from across the globe converging on the University of Leicester Council Chamber.

The University of Leicester, in association with Leicester City Council and the Richard III Society, is leading the Search for Richard III.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Leicester. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Leicester. "King Richard III? World's first image of Grey Friars skull unveiled." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130203212409.htm>.
University of Leicester. (2013, February 4). King Richard III? World's first image of Grey Friars skull unveiled. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130203212409.htm
University of Leicester. "King Richard III? World's first image of Grey Friars skull unveiled." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130203212409.htm (accessed February 27, 2015).

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