Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Neuronal activity induces tau release from healthy neurons

Date:
February 17, 2013
Source:
European Molecular Biology Organization
Summary:
Researchers have discovered that neuronal activity can stimulate tau release from healthy neurons in the absence of cell death. The results show that treatment of neurons with known biological signaling molecules increases the release of tau into the culture medium. The release of tau from cortical neurons is therefore a physiological process that can be regulated by neuronal activity.

Researchers from King's College London have discovered that neuronal activity can stimulate tau release from healthy neurons in the absence of cell death. The results published by Diane Hanger and her colleagues in EMBO reports show that treatment of neurons with known biological signaling molecules increases the release of tau into the culture medium. The release of tau from cortical neurons is therefore a physiological process that can be regulated by neuronal activity.

Tau proteins stabilize microtubules, the long threads of polymers that help to maintain the structure of the cell. However, in Alzheimer's disease or certain types of dementia, tau accumulates in neurons or glial cells, where it contributes to neurodegeneration.

In addition to intracellular aggregation, recent experiments have shown that tau is released from neuronal cells and taken up by neighboring cells, which allows the spread of aggregated tau across the brain. This release could occur passively from dying neuronal cells, though some evidence suggests it might take place before neuronal cell death and neurodegeneration. The new findings indicate that tau release is an active process in healthy neurons and this could be altered in diseased brains.

"Our findings suggest that altered tau release is likely to occur in response to changes in neuronal excitability in the Alzheimer's brain. Secreted tau could therefore be involved in the propagation of tau pathology in tauopathies, a group of neurodegenerative diseases associated with the accumulation of tau proteins in the brain," commented Diane Hanger, Reader in the Department of Neuroscience at King's College London. In these experiments, Amy Pooler, the lead au-thor, revealed that molecules such as potassium chloride, glutamate or an AM-PA receptor agonist could release tau from cortical neurons in an active physio-logical process that is, at least partially, dependent on pre-synaptic vesicle se-cretion.

The new findings by the scientists indicate that tau has previously unknown roles in biological signaling between cells, in addition to its well-established role in stabilizing microtubules.

"We believe that targeting the release of tau could be explored as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies," said Hanger. Additional studies are needed in model organisms to test this hypothesis further.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European Molecular Biology Organization. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Amy M Pooler, Emma C Phillips, Dawn H W Lau, Wendy Noble, Diane P Hanger. Physiological release of endogenous tau is stimulated by neuronal activity. EMBO reports, 2013; DOI: 10.1038/embor.2013.15

Cite This Page:

European Molecular Biology Organization. "Neuronal activity induces tau release from healthy neurons." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130217085031.htm>.
European Molecular Biology Organization. (2013, February 17). Neuronal activity induces tau release from healthy neurons. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130217085031.htm
European Molecular Biology Organization. "Neuronal activity induces tau release from healthy neurons." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130217085031.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Corporal Punishment on Decline, Debate Renews

Corporal Punishment on Decline, Debate Renews

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) Corporal punishment in the United States is on the decline, but there is renewed debate over its use after Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was charged with child abuse. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

AP (Sep. 15, 2014) The FDA is considering whether to ban devices used by the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Massachusetts, the only place in the country known to use electrical skin shocks as aversive conditioning for aggressive patients. (Sept. 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Magic Mushrooms' Could Help Smokers Quit

'Magic Mushrooms' Could Help Smokers Quit

Newsy (Sep. 11, 2014) In a small study, researchers found that the majority of long-time smokers quit after taking psilocybin pills and undergoing therapy sessions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins