Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Abnormal growth regulation may occur in children with heart defects

Date:
February 19, 2013
Source:
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Summary:
The poor growth seen in children born with complex heart defects may result from factors beyond deficient nutrition. A new study by pediatric researchers suggests that abnormalities in overall growth regulation play a role.

The poor growth seen in children born with complex heart defects may result from factors beyond deficient nutrition. A new study by pediatric researchers suggests that abnormalities in overall growth regulation play a role.

Related Articles


"When compared with their healthy peers, children with congenital heart disease have impaired growth, as measured in weight, length, and head circumference," said senior author Meryl S. Cohen, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist in the Cardiac Center at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "We investigated patterns of poor growth in these children, as a starting point in guiding us toward more effective treatments."

The study appeared as an online article in the January 2013 issue of Pediatrics.

The researchers performed a retrospective analysis of medical records of 856 children with congenital heart disease (CHD), compared to 7,654 matched control subjects. All the children were measured up to age 3, and all were drawn from the healthcare network of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Within weeks of birth, the children with CHD had significant deficits in weight, length and head circumference, compared to matched controls without CHD. The largest differences in weight occurred at 4 months of age. Among the 856 children with CHD, the 248 who required surgical repair were much more likely to be below the 3rd percentile in weight, length and head circumference during early infancy, and their growth by age 3 did not catch up with that of their healthy peers.

In the 608 children with CHD who did not require surgery, growth differences were not as pronounced, but even their growth patterns lagged behind those of healthy controls.

Researchers already knew that children with CHD have an increased risk for poor growth, but this analysis provides a fuller picture of the problem. Cohen observed that in the general population, when caloric intake is insufficient, an infant's weight is usually affected first, followed by length and head circumference. "The fact that all three parameters changed simultaneously rather than sequentially supports the idea that impaired growth in children with heart disease is affected at least in part by factors unrelated to nutrition."

She added that further studies should investigate the possible roles of growth hormones and other physiologic factors that affect growth regulation in children with CHD.

Cohen's co-authors were first author Carrie Daymont, M.D., of the University of Manitoba, Ashley Neal, M.D., of Children's Hospital Boston, and Aaron Prosnitz, M.D., of Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital. All were at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia when the research was performed.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Carrie Daymont, Ashley Neal, Aaron Prosnitz and Meryl S. Cohen. Growth in Children With Congenital Heart Disease. Pediatrics, Jan. 2013, pp. e236-e242 DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-1157d

Cite This Page:

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Abnormal growth regulation may occur in children with heart defects." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130219120941.htm>.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. (2013, February 19). Abnormal growth regulation may occur in children with heart defects. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130219120941.htm
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Abnormal growth regulation may occur in children with heart defects." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130219120941.htm (accessed November 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins