Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Pancreatitis doubles for those taking new class of diabetes drugs, scientists say

Date:
February 21, 2013
Source:
Johns Hopkins Medicine
Summary:
People who take the newest class of diabetes drugs to control blood sugar are twice as likely as those on other forms of sugar-control medication to be hospitalized with pancreatitis, researchers report.

People who take the newest class of diabetes drugs to control blood sugar are twice as likely as those on other forms of sugar-control medication to be hospitalized with pancreatitis, Johns Hopkins researchers report.

In an article published online in JAMA Internal Medicine, the scientists say the new drugs -- glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies (GLP-1) -- are associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for acute pancreatitis. The agents sitagliptin and exenatide -- generic names for the drugs sold under the brand names Januvia and Byetta -- appear to contribute to the formation of lesions in the pancreas and the proliferation of ducts in the organ, resulting in wellsprings of inflammation.

Physicians and regulators have been aware that pancreatitis could be a side effect of GLP-1 therapies, a risk that emerged in animal studies and reports to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. But the Johns Hopkins investigators say their study is the first to accurately measure the strength of this risk in analyses that accounted for other pancreatitis risk factors, such as gallstones, obesity and heavy alcohol use.

"These agents are used by millions of Americans with diabetes. These new diabetes drugs are very effective in lowering blood glucose. However, important safety findings may not have been fully explored and some side effects such as acute pancreatitis don't appear until widespread use after approval," says study leader Sonal Singh, M.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Patients should be alert to symptoms of pancreatitis -- nausea, vomiting that won't stop, abdominal pain -- and seek treatment immediately if any symptoms noted on the drug label occur.

Pancreatitis is marked by inflammation of the pancreas, the organ that releases such hormones as insulin and glucagon, as well as enzymes that help digest food. A painful condition, pancreatitis can be dangerous if left untreated.

Singh and his colleagues based their findings on analysis of data from seven BlueCross BlueShield health insurance plans. They first identified 1,269 beneficiaries with type 2 diabetes who filled at least one prescription for any drug to treat the disease between 2005 and 2008. After matching them with 1,269 type 2 diabetics who had not, and controlling for the other known pancreatitis risk factors, the researchers found that people who took one of the GLP-1 therapies were twice as likely to be hospitalized with pancreatitis within 60 days of first taking the drugs as those who had taken a different medication.

In a healthy person, the pancreas releases insulin to help the body store and use sugar from food. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce the right amount of insulin or the body does not respond appropriately to the hormone. When there isn't enough insulin, or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) can't get into the body's cells and builds up in the bloodstream instead. Because of the role of the pancreas in diabetes, people with diabetes are already at an increased risk for pancreatitis.

This research was supported by the Johns Hopkins Clinical Research Scholars Program, the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Research Resources (1KL2RR025006-03) and the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research.

Other Johns Hopkins researchers involved in the study include Hsien-Yen Chang, Ph.D.; Thomas M. Richards, M.S.; Jonathan P. Weiner, Dr.Ph.; Jeanne M. Clark, M.D., M.P.H.; and Jodi B. Segal, M.D., M.P.H.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Medicine. "Pancreatitis doubles for those taking new class of diabetes drugs, scientists say." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130221141104.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Medicine. (2013, February 21). Pancreatitis doubles for those taking new class of diabetes drugs, scientists say. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130221141104.htm
Johns Hopkins Medicine. "Pancreatitis doubles for those taking new class of diabetes drugs, scientists say." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130221141104.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

AP (July 30, 2014) At least 20 New Jersey residents have tested positive for chikungunya, a mosquito-borne virus that has spread through the Caribbean. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Center for Science in the Public Interest released its 2014 list of single meals with whopping calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins