Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Simple method devised for determining atrial fibrillation risk in women

Date:
February 26, 2013
Source:
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Summary:
Researchers have devised and tested a simple atrial fibrillation risk prediction model, based on six easily obtained factors: A woman's age, height, weight, blood pressure, alcohol consumption and smoking history.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of abnormal heart rhythm, affecting 2.5 million Americans. If left undetected or untreated, atrial fibrillation can lead to stroke. Determining who is at increased risk for atrial fibrillation has been difficult, especially among individuals without established heart disease. But now, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have devised and tested a simple atrial fibrillation risk prediction model, based on six easily obtained factors: a woman's age, height, weight, blood pressure, alcohol consumption and smoking history.

Related Articles


The model is published in the online edition of the European Heart Journal on February 26, 2013.

"The real strength of this model is its simplicity," said Brendan Everett, MD, the lead author of the study and a cardiologist at BWH. "Using this tool, we can estimate an otherwise healthy woman's risk of developing atrial fibrillation over the next 10 years. The tool only requires that a patient's health care provider know some basic information about the patient. There is no need for any advanced testing or additional cost in order to use the risk tool."

The risk prediction model was derived and tested in more than 20,000 middle aged women of European ancestry. Researchers found that the new model was significantly better at identifying women at increased risk for atrial fibrillation over the next 10 years than estimating a woman's risk of atrial fibrillation using her age alone.

"Nearly one in four women were reassigned to a more accurate atrial fibrillation risk category by using the new model," said Everett. "While specific interventions to lower a woman's risk of a first atrial fibrillation episode are still in development, this personalized information can help health care providers stress the importance of heart healthy behaviors, including weight loss and moderation of alcohol consumption."

The study also examined whether recently discovered genetic markers for atrial fibrillation risk improved researchers' ability to accurately predict a woman's risk for atrial fibrillation and indeed, the researchers found that a genetic risk score has potential to improve the ability to predict atrial fribrillation. However, Everett notes that while this information is scientifically interesting, more research on genetic testing is needed before this combination model can be recommended for use in the general public. Further research is also needed to determine if the study results would apply to men or a broader population of women.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Brigham and Women's Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Brendan M. Everett, Nancy R. Cook, David Conen, Daniel I. Chasman, Paul M. Ridker, and Christine M. Albert. Novel genetic markers improve measures of atrial fibrillation risk prediction. European Heart Journal, February 26, 2013 DOI: 10.1093/eurheartj/eht033

Cite This Page:

Brigham and Women's Hospital. "Simple method devised for determining atrial fibrillation risk in women." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130226141254.htm>.
Brigham and Women's Hospital. (2013, February 26). Simple method devised for determining atrial fibrillation risk in women. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130226141254.htm
Brigham and Women's Hospital. "Simple method devised for determining atrial fibrillation risk in women." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130226141254.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

Newsy (Nov. 28, 2014) — WHO cites four studies that say Ebola can still be detected in semen up to 82 days after the onset of symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins