Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Negative-charge carrying molecular structures created

Date:
March 18, 2013
Source:
University of Oregon
Summary:
Chemists have synthesized organic molecular structures that move both positive and negative electrical charges -- a highly desired but often difficult combination to achieve in current efforts to create highly flexible electronic devices and other new technologies.

Bent-shaped X-ray structures detailed in Organic Letters.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Oregon

University of Oregon chemists have synthesized organic molecular structures that move both positive and negative electrical charges -- a highly desired but often difficult combination to achieve in current efforts to create highly flexible electronic devices and other new-age technologies.

The research utilized a family of readily available and inexpensive hydrocarbons known as indenofluorenes to build molecular scaffolding for integrative circuitry. An indenofluorene-derivative framework, said co-author Michael M. Haley, head of the UO Department of Chemistry, offers more simplicity, flexibility and affordability than that available using many other hydrocarbon-based approaches.

Haley's lab in the UO's Materials Science Institute reported a linear version of the new molecular structure in the Journal of the American Chemical Society last June. For the new paper -- placed online in advance of regular publication in the ACS journal Organic Letters -- Haley's team manipulated that infrastructure into a more bent architecture and tested some of its fundamental optical and electronic properties.

Using organic molecules is helping materials scientists move beyond silicon semiconductor technology, said Aaron G. Fix, a doctoral student in Haley's lab and lead author of the new paper. "You don't need to lay the molecules on silicon. They can be laid on plastics and other materials, as long as you have the necessary metallic or graphite contacts," he said. "These new materials will allow for electronics that can take on stresses at levels traditional silicon, which is brittle, cannot handle. We will be able to make stretchable and bendable devices."

A lot of different materials can be used in organic electronic devices, Fix said. Most of them, he added, move positive charges well but not negative charges. "We are trying to fill that niche by developing materials that can do that well," he said.

Researchers pursuing devices utilizing organic semiconducting technology already are envisioning applications from roll-up computers to synthetic skin for robotic and prosthetic applications. Similar research done elsewhere with such approaches has surfaced in some smart phones and television screens.

"Specifically, we are doing research on transporting electrons using these indenofluorene materials for building integrated circuits for computers," said co-author Parker E. Deal, who worked in Haley's lab on both projects as an undergraduate chemistry major in the Robert D. Clark Honors College at the UO. "This is fundamental research in that these are new molecules that nobody has made before, and we are studying them to see how effective they are and how they may further our improvement of these materials to build cheap, flexible devices."

The project, Haley said, is "old-school chemistry" and uses no precious metals. These hydrocarbons, he said, are cheap and easily manipulated for creating artificial materials. "And we have shown that we are able to prepare the materials in gram quantities with good overall yields and excellent purity using methodologies that should work in large-scale production," he said.

Haley's team is about to work with an outside collaborator to test the new scaffolding in an electronic device. If successful, Haley said, work on the approach can move forward.

"This research by Dr. Haley and his team promises to open a whole new world of possibilities for scientists and innovators," said Kimberly Andrews Espy, vice president for research and innovation at the University of Oregon. "Researchers at the University of Oregon continue to solve today's challenges through the development of tools and technologies that will redefine our future."

The National Science Foundation supported the research (grants CHE-1013032, CHE-0923589 and OCI-0960354). Co-author Bradley D. Rose, a doctoral student, worked on both projects under the Emmanuil Troyansky Fellowship of the American Chemical Society.

Additional co-authors were graduate student Chris L. Vonnegut and Lev N. Zakharov of the UO-based Center for Advanced Materials Characterization in Oregon (CAMCOR).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Oregon. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Aaron G. Fix, Parker E. Deal, Chris L. Vonnegut, Bradley D. Rose, Lev N. Zakharov, Michael M. Haley. Indeno[2,1-c]fluorene: A New Electron-Accepting Scaffold for Organic Electronics. Organic Letters, 2013; 15 (6): 1362 DOI: 10.1021/ol400318z

Cite This Page:

University of Oregon. "Negative-charge carrying molecular structures created." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130318133016.htm>.
University of Oregon. (2013, March 18). Negative-charge carrying molecular structures created. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130318133016.htm
University of Oregon. "Negative-charge carrying molecular structures created." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130318133016.htm (accessed July 26, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

AFP (July 25, 2014) Europe's highest train, the little train of Artouste in the French Pyrenees, celebrates its 80th birthday. Duration: 01:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
TSA Administrator on Politics and Flight Bans

TSA Administrator on Politics and Flight Bans

AP (July 24, 2014) TSA administrator, John Pistole's took part in the Aspen Security Forum 2014, where he answered questions on lifting of the ban on flights into Israel's Tel Aviv airport and whether politics played a role in lifting the ban. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

AP (July 24, 2014) Mobile phone companies and communities across the country are going to new lengths to disguise those unsightly cellphone towers. From a church bell tower to a flagpole, even a pencil, some towers are trying to make a point. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Algonquin Power Goes Activist on Its Target Gas Natural

Algonquin Power Goes Activist on Its Target Gas Natural

TheStreet (July 23, 2014) When The Deal's Amanda Levin exclusively reported that Gas Natural had been talking to potential suitors, the Ohio company responded with a flat denial, claiming its board had not talked to anyone about a possible sale. Lo and behold, Canadian utility Algonquin Power and Utilities not only had approached the company, but it did it three times. Its last offer was for $13 per share as Gas Natural's was trading at a 60-day moving average of about $12.50 per share. Now Algonquin, which has a 4.9% stake in Gas Natural, has taken its case to shareholders, calling on them to back its proposals or, possibly, a change in the target's board. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins