Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study reveals risk factors for blood clots in pregnant and postnatal women

Date:
April 2, 2013
Source:
University of Nottingham
Summary:
Women who have suffered a still birth or have medical conditions including varicose veins, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or heart disease are at greater risk of developing dangerous blood clots after giving birth, a study has revealed.

Women who have suffered a still birth or have medical conditions including varicose veins, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or heart disease are at greater risk of developing dangerous blood clots after giving birth, a study has revealed.

Related Articles


The research, led by academics at The University of Nottingham, found that being obese, suffering bleeding during pregnancy or labour and having a premature birth or delivery via caesarean section also increased the risk of a venous thromboembolism (VTE).

Their findings, published in the American Society of Hematology journal Blood, could have important implications for the way in which at-risk women are identified and preventative measures administered.

Epidemiologist Dr Matthew Grainge, in the University's School of Community Health Sciences, who led the study, said: "VTE is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy and childbirth. It affects around one or two pregnancies per 1,000 but, despite this, remains a leading cause of mortality in expectant and new mothers in developed countries.

"Preventative measures for VTE, such as a daily dose of heparin, may not be cost effective or safe and are therefore only recommended for women who are considered high risk. However, there is currently inconsistency and disagreement over the factors which put women in that high-risk category and we hope that this research will provide clinicians with valuable new information."

VTE -- such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) -- are blood clots that form in a blood vessel and can be potentially life-threatening if the clot breaks off (embolises) and travels to the lung causing a blockage of the arteries of the lung known as pulmonary embolism (PE).

The study used data from GP patient records, hospital discharge forms and medications prescribed by primary healthcare professionals to study pregnancies of women aged between 15 and 44 between January 1995 and July 2009 -- totalling almost 400,000 pregnancies.

Researchers identified all women who developed VTE for the first time during their pregnancy, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT), then extracted important key information about the mother from their medical records including their age, body mass index (BMI) and whether they smoked.

In addition, they considered other pregnancy-related factors such as how the baby was delivered, whether it was a stillbirth or premature birth and any associated complications including pre-eclampsia, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Co-existing medical factors including varicose veins, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and heart conditions such as heart disease were also taken into account.

They then used sophisticated data analysis methods to calculate the incident rate ratios to compare the risks of VTE to people without the specified risk factor.

They discovered that the risk of VTE during pregnancy was only marginally higher for women who were aged over 35 years old, had a BMI greater than 25 or who smoked. Medical complications such as pre-existing diabetes, varicose veins and IBD were all associated with greater risk, but not pre-existing high blood pressure.

The risks were much higher for new mothers. Postnatal women with a BMI greater than 30 were four times more likely to develop a VTE, while delivery by caesarean section, multiple previous births (three or more), bleeding in pregnancy and premature birth all doubled the chances of a women developing a VTE.

Perhaps most significantly, women who suffered a still birth were six times more likely to have a VTE.

Dr Grainge added: "Our results may have important implications for the way that preventative measures for VTE are delivered in healthcare settings in developed countries. We believe the strong association between stillbirths and premature births and VTE in particular is a finding of real importance which has received only limited attention to date. They are not currently incorporated in the guidelines for risk assessment for VTE and, if they were, then many cases associated with those risk factors could potentially be prevented."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Nottingham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alyshah Abdul Sultan, Laila J. Tata, Joe West, Linda Fiaschi, Kate M. Fleming, Catherine Nelson-Piercy, and Matthew J. Grainge. Risk factors for first venous thromboembolism around pregnancy: a population based cohort study from the United Kingdom Blood blood-2012-11-469551. Blood, April 2, 2013 DOI: 10.1182/blood-2012-11-469551

Cite This Page:

University of Nottingham. "Study reveals risk factors for blood clots in pregnant and postnatal women." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402124541.htm>.
University of Nottingham. (2013, April 2). Study reveals risk factors for blood clots in pregnant and postnatal women. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402124541.htm
University of Nottingham. "Study reveals risk factors for blood clots in pregnant and postnatal women." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402124541.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins