Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Shape from sound: New methods to probe the universe

Date:
April 3, 2013
Source:
Princeton University
Summary:
A new mathematical tool should allow scientists to use "sound" to help reveal the shape of the universe.

Ultra deep field image reveals galaxies galore. As the uni­verse expands, it is con­tin­u­ally sub­jected to energy shifts, or "quan­tum fluc­tu­a­tions," that send out lit­tle pulses of "sound" into the fab­ric of space­time. In fact, the uni­verse is thought to have sprung from just such an energy shift.
Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI) and the HUDF Team

As the uni­verse expands, it is con­tin­u­ally sub­jected to energy shifts, or "quan­tum fluc­tu­a­tions," that send out lit­tle pulses of "sound" into the fab­ric of space­time. In fact, the uni­verse is thought to have sprung from just such an energy shift.

A recent paper in the jour­nal Phys­i­cal Review Let­ters reports a new math­e­mat­i­cal tool that should allow one to use these sounds to help reveal the shape of the uni­verse. The authors recon­sider an old ques­tion in spec­tral geom­e­try that asks, roughly, to what extent can the shape of a thing be known from the sound of its acoustic vibra­tions? The researchers approached this prob­lem by break­ing it down into small work­able pieces, accord­ing to author Tejal Bhamre, a Prince­ton Uni­ver­sity grad­u­ate stu­dent in the Depart­ment of Physics.

To under­stand the authors' method, con­sider a vase. If one taps a vase with a spoon, it will make a sound that is char­ac­ter­is­tic of its shape. Sim­i­larly, the tech­nique Bhamre and her coau­thors devel­oped could, in prin­ci­ple, deter­mine the shape of space­time from the per­pet­ual ring­ing caused by quan­tum fluctuations.

The researchers' tech­nique also pro­vides a unique con­nec­tion between the two pil­lars of mod­ern physics -- quan­tum the­ory and gen­eral rel­a­tiv­ity -- by using vibra­tional wave­lengths to define the geo­met­ric prop­erty that is spacetime.

Bhamre worked with coau­thors David Aasen, a physics grad­u­ate stu­dent at Cal­tech, and Achim Kempf, a Water­loo Uni­ver­sity pro­fes­sor of physics of information.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Princeton University. The original article was written by Mor­gan Kelly. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. David Aasen, Tejal Bhamre, Achim Kempf. Shape from Sound: Toward New Tools for Quantum Gravity. Physical Review Letters, 2013; 110 (12) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.121301

Cite This Page:

Princeton University. "Shape from sound: New methods to probe the universe." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403131359.htm>.
Princeton University. (2013, April 3). Shape from sound: New methods to probe the universe. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403131359.htm
Princeton University. "Shape from sound: New methods to probe the universe." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403131359.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Computers & Math News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Google Plans To Speed Up Web Pages With New Image Format

Google Plans To Speed Up Web Pages With New Image Format

Newsy (July 21, 2014) — Google is using compressed images in WebP format to help boost page loading times. The files are 25-to-34 percent smaller than PNGs and JPEGs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Uruguayan Creates Chess Game for Multiple Opponents

Uruguayan Creates Chess Game for Multiple Opponents

AFP (July 19, 2014) — It no longer takes two to play chess – or at least according to a new version of the game invented by Uruguayan Gabriel Baldi, where up to four opponents can play. Duration: 00:31 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Clock Ticks Down on Internet Speed Debate

Clock Ticks Down on Internet Speed Debate

Reuters - US Online Video (July 18, 2014) — The FCC received more than 800,000 comments on whether and how internet speeds should be regulated, even crashing its system. Lily Jamali reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google Won't Call Games With In-App Add-Ons Free, Apple Will

Google Won't Call Games With In-App Add-Ons Free, Apple Will

Newsy (July 18, 2014) — The European Commission asked Google and Apple not to label apps "free" if they include in-app purchases. Google has complied; Apple has resisted. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins