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Breakthrough in chemical crystallography

Date:
April 5, 2013
Source:
Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland)
Summary:
Scientists have made a fundamental breakthrough in single-crystal X-ray analysis, the most powerful method for molecular structure determination.

A research team led by Professor Makoto Fujita of the University of Tokyo, Japan, and complemented by Academy Professor Kari Rissanen of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, has made a fundamental breakthrough in single-crystal X-ray analysis, the most powerful method for molecular structure determination.

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X-ray single-crystal diffraction (SCD) analysis has the intrinsic limitation that the target molecule must be obtained as single crystals. Now, Professor Fujita's team at the University of Tokyo together with Academy Professor Rissanen at the University of Jyväskylä have established a new protocol for SCD analysis that does not require the crystallisation of the target molecule. In this method, a very small crystal of a porous complex absorbs the target molecule from the solution, enabling the crystallographic analysis of the structure of the absorbed guest along with the host framework.

As the SCD analysis is carried out with only one crystal, smaller than 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.1 mm in size, the required amount of the target molecule can be as low as 80 ng. Fujita's and Rissanen's work reports the structure determination of a scarce marine natural product from only 5 µg of it. Many natural and synthetic compounds for which chemists have almost given up the hope of analysing crystallographically can now be easily and precisely characterised by this method.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Yasuhide Inokuma, Shota Yoshioka, Junko Ariyoshi, Tatsuhiko Arai, Yuki Hitora, Kentaro Takada, Shigeki Matsunaga, Kari Rissanen, Makoto Fujita. X-ray analysis on the nanogram to microgram scale using porous complexes. Nature, 2013; 495 (7442): 461 DOI: 10.1038/nature11990

Cite This Page:

Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). "Breakthrough in chemical crystallography." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130405064243.htm>.
Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). (2013, April 5). Breakthrough in chemical crystallography. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130405064243.htm
Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). "Breakthrough in chemical crystallography." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130405064243.htm (accessed April 21, 2015).

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