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Manipulating calcium accumulation in blood vessels may provide a new way to treat heart disease

Date:
April 9, 2013
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis, is the primary cause of heart disease. It's caused by calcium accumulation in the blood vessels, which leads to obstruction of blood flow and heart complications. Although many risk factors for atherosclerosis have been identified, the cause isn't known and there's currently no way to reverse it once it sets in. In a new study, researchers have characterized the cells responsible for driving this calcium build-up in vessel walls.

Hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis, is the primary cause of heart disease. It is caused by calcium accumulation in the blood vessels, which leads to arteries becoming narrow and stiff, obstructing blood flow and leading to heart complications. Although many risk factors for atherosclerosis have been identified, the cause is not known and there is currently no way to reverse it once it sets in. In a new study published 9th April in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers have characterized the cells responsible for driving this calcium build-up in vessel walls.

The process of calcium accumulation in blood vessels resembles bone formation and involves maintaining a balance between bone-forming cells called osteoblasts and bone-destroying cells called osteoclasts. In the new study, Hyo-Soo Kim and colleagues characterize the origin of a population of vascular calcifying progenitor cells, and the potential of these cells to differentiate into different cell types.

"We show that vascular calcifying progenitor cells in the artery have the potential to become either osteoblasts or osteoclasts," said Dr Kim of Seoul National University. "And a certain chemical can push these cells towards becoming osteoclasts, which leads to the softening of the blood vessels."

The researchers sorted cells from the aortas of mice into two groups. Both groups originated from bone marrow and expressed a cell surface protein, called Sca-1, but only one group expressed another cell surface protein called PDGFRα. They found that the cells which only expressed Sca-1 could become either osteoblasts or osteoclasts, whereas the cells which expressed both Sca-1 and PDGFRα were committed to an osteoblastic lineage.

The team then treated the cells with a protein called PPARγ, which is known to promote the formation of osteoclasts and inhibit the formation of osteoblasts. When treated with PPARγ, only Sca-1 expressed cells preferentially differentiated into osteoclast-like cells. Furthermore, in vivo study demonstrated that, while bidirectional cells that were injected into mouse models of atherosclerosis increased the severity of calcium build-up in arteries, cells that were then treated with a drug activating PPARγ markedly decreased this effect and even reversed the calcification.

"These findings suggest that a subtype of calcifying progenitor cells offer a new therapeutic target for the prevention of calcification," said Dr Kim. "This opens up the possibility of new drug development to inhibit the hardening of the arteries, and thereby reduce the risk of heart disease."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Hyun-Ju Cho, Hyun-Jai Cho, Ho-Jae Lee, Myung-Kang Song, Ji-Yun Seo, Yeon-Hee Bae, Ju-Young Kim, Hae-Young Lee, Whal Lee, Bon-Kwon Koo, Byung-Hee Oh, Young-Bae Park, Hyo-Soo Kim. Vascular Calcifying Progenitor Cells Possess Bidirectional Differentiation Potentials. PLoS Biology, 2013; 11 (4): e1001534 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001534

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Manipulating calcium accumulation in blood vessels may provide a new way to treat heart disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130409173500.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2013, April 9). Manipulating calcium accumulation in blood vessels may provide a new way to treat heart disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130409173500.htm
Public Library of Science. "Manipulating calcium accumulation in blood vessels may provide a new way to treat heart disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130409173500.htm (accessed August 29, 2014).

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