Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Effect of medication is affected by copies of genetic information

Date:
April 10, 2013
Source:
University of Gothenburg
Summary:
The number of copies of the complete genetic information found in human cells can have a decisive effect on the properties of these cells. The results may help to explain why certain medications have strong side effects on sperm and eggs, and why certain organisms remain unaffected by environmental changes.

The number of copies of the complete genetic information found in human cells can have a decisive effect on the properties of these cells. The results may help to explain why certain medications have strong side effects on sperm and eggs, and why certain organisms remain unaffected by environmental changes.

This is shown by studies that researchers from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, together with researchers from Norway and France, are now publishing in the journal PLoS Genetics.

All cells in our bodies contain copies of the genetic information. However, different cells contain different numbers of the complete genetic information. Normal human cells usually contain two copies of the genetic information, and thus two copies of every gene. Eggs and sperm, however, only contain one set of genes.

"At the same time, the cells of many plants and amphibians contain many more copies of genetic information, and the number of copies can also vary during an organism's development and between different stages of life," explains Jonas Warringer, a researcher at the University of Gothenburg's Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology.

Research has often overlooked this variation in genetic information. However, Jonas Warringer and his colleagues have now used ordinary baker's yeast to show that the number of copies of genetic information has a decisive effect on the properties of cells.

Jonas and his colleagues collected yeast samples from around the world and created two variants of each yeast culture -- one with two copies of the genetic information, and the other with just one copy. The researchers then examined the properties of these yeast cells, such as their tolerance to cancer medication and antibiotics. The study, which is reported on in the journal PLOS One, shows that the number of copies of genetic information has a decisive effect on the properties of cells.

"The cells with two copies of genetic information showed greater tolerance to some substances," continues Jonas, "while in other cases those with only one copy had an advantage. Surprisingly enough, these effects were even maintained in species separated by several billions of generations of evolution, suggesting that they are actually of great importance in nature."

The researchers' discovery may be of considerable significance in terms of knowledge about what lies behind differences between organisms in nature.

"It may also help to explain why certain medications have particularly strong side effects on sperm and eggs whereas others do not, and why certain organisms are affected by some environmental changes while others are unaffected," he concludes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Gothenburg. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Enikφ Zφrgφ, Karolina Chwialkowska, Arne B. Gjuvsland, Elena Garrι, Per Sunnerhagen, Gianni Liti, Anders Blomberg, Stig W. Omholt, Jonas Warringer. Ancient Evolutionary Trade-Offs between Yeast Ploidy States. PLoS Genetics, 2013; 9 (3): e1003388 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003388

Cite This Page:

University of Gothenburg. "Effect of medication is affected by copies of genetic information." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410094139.htm>.
University of Gothenburg. (2013, April 10). Effect of medication is affected by copies of genetic information. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410094139.htm
University of Gothenburg. "Effect of medication is affected by copies of genetic information." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130410094139.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins