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Experts examine Mediterranean diet's health effects for older adults

Date:
April 18, 2013
Source:
The Gerontological Society of America
Summary:
According to a new study, a baseline adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk of hyperuricemia, defined as a serum uric acid concentration higher than 7mg/dl in men and higher than 6mg/dl in women.
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According to a study published in the Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, a baseline adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MeDiet) is associated with a lower risk of hyperuricemia, defined as a serum uric acid (SUA) concentration higher than 7mg/dl in men and higher than 6mg/dl in women.

Hyperuricemia has been associated with metabolic syndrome, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, gout, and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The MeDiet is characterized by a high consumption of fruits, vegetables, legumes, olive oil, nuts, and whole grain; a moderate consumption of wine, dairy products, and poultry, and a low consumption of red meat, sweet beverages, creams, and pastries. Due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, the MeDiet might play a role in decreasing SUA concentrations.

Conducted by Marta Guasch-Ferré and 11 others, this study is the first to analyze the relationship between adherence to a MeDiet in older adults and the risk of hyperuricemia. The five-year study looks at 7,447 participants assigned to one of three intervention diets (two MeDiets enriched with extra virgin olive oil or mixed nuts, or a control low-fat diet). Participants were men aged 55 to 80 years and women aged 60 to 80 years who were free of cardiovascular disease but who had either type 2 diabetes mellitus or were at risk of coronary heart disease.

The findings below demonstrate the positive health effects of a MeDiet in older adults:

  • Rates of reversion were higher among hyperuricemic participants at baseline who had greater adherence to the MeDiet.
  • Consuming less than one serving a day of red meat compared with higher intake is associated with 23 percent reduced risk of hyperuricemia.
  • Consuming fish and seafood increased the prevalence of hyperuricemia.
  • Drinking more than seven glasses of wine per week increased the prevalence of hyperuricemia.
  • Consuming legumes and sofrito sauce reduced the prevalence of hyperuricemia.
  • Reversion of hyperuricemia was achieved by adherence to the MeDiet alone, without weight loss or changes to physical activity.

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by The Gerontological Society of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marta Guasch-Ferré, Mònica Bulló, Nancy Babio, Miguel A. Martínez-González, Ramon Estruch, María-Isabel Covas, Julia Wärnberg, Fernando Arós, José Lapetra, Lluís Serra-Majem, Josep Basora, And Jordi Salas-Salvadó. Mediterranean Diet and Risk of Hyperuricemia in Elderly Participants at High Cardiovascular Risk. Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences,, 2013 DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glt028

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The Gerontological Society of America. "Experts examine Mediterranean diet's health effects for older adults." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130418125749.htm>.
The Gerontological Society of America. (2013, April 18). Experts examine Mediterranean diet's health effects for older adults. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130418125749.htm
The Gerontological Society of America. "Experts examine Mediterranean diet's health effects for older adults." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130418125749.htm (accessed August 1, 2015).

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