Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New medication treats drug-resistant prostate cancer in the laboratory

Date:
June 17, 2013
Source:
Endocrine Society
Summary:
A new drug called pyrvinium pamoate inhibits aggressive forms of prostate cancer that are resistant to standard drugs, according to a study conducted in an animal model.

A new drug called pyrvinium pamoate inhibits aggressive forms of prostate cancer that are resistant to standard drugs, according to a study conducted in an animal model.

The results will be presented Monday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

"Our novel prostate cancer drug works by a unique mechanism of action," said study lead author Jeremy Jones, PhD, assistant professor of molecular pharmacology at City of Hope, Beckman Research Institute, in Duarte, CA. "Thus, it has the potential to treat cancers resistant to currently approved therapies."

Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death, after lung cancer, among men in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society. The disease affects about one out of every six men, and more than 29,000 will die of prostate cancer this year alone.

An age-related disease, prostate cancer usually affects men who are 65 or older. In addition to advanced age, genes and certain environmental factors influence the development of prostate cancer, although the exact causes remain unknown.

In a healthy prostate gland, cells express a protein called androgen-receptor, or AR, which is activated by male sex hormones, or androgens, including the primary male hormone testosterone. These same receptors also play a role in promoting the growth of the abnormal cells of prostate cancer.

The drugs that are currently available to treat prostate cancer work by preventing androgen from binding to the AR. Specifically, the drugs block androgen from attaching to a certain part of the AR known as the ligand-binding domain. This domain is the part of the receptor that hormones bind to when they activate the receptor. By blocking all androgen activity, these drugs induce chemical castration.

The problem is that prostate-cancer cells usually become resistant to androgen blockage. After initially responding, these aggressive cancers develop mutations that enable them to spread, or metastasize, without the influence of androgens. For this reason, these aggressive prostate cancers are called castration-resistant.

In contrast, the study drug binds to a different part of the AR that does not require androgen, according to Jones. "Our new lead compound, pyrvinium pamoate, works by a unique mechanism that involves binding to a different site on the AR and inhibiting its activity without preventing androgen binding," he said. "We are hopeful that an optimized derivative of pyrvinium will be able to inhibit all AR activity and inhibit the growth of human prostate cancers that become resistant to other AR-targeted therapies and perhaps result in a curative metastatic prostate cancer therapy."

Investigators conducted this pre-clinical study using prostate-cancer cells in an animal model.

The National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute supported part of this study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Endocrine Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Endocrine Society. "New medication treats drug-resistant prostate cancer in the laboratory." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 June 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130617160730.htm>.
Endocrine Society. (2013, June 17). New medication treats drug-resistant prostate cancer in the laboratory. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130617160730.htm
Endocrine Society. "New medication treats drug-resistant prostate cancer in the laboratory." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130617160730.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Peace Corps is one of several U.S.-based organizations to pull workers out of West Africa because of the Ebola outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Health officials say 2,000 deaths occur each year in the U.S. due to weather, but it's excessive heat and cold that claim the most lives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins