Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Breath analysis reliably indicates presence, level of infection in mice

Date:
August 1, 2013
Source:
University of California - Irvine
Summary:
Breath analysis may prove to be an accurate, noninvasive way to quickly determine the severity of bacterial and other infections, according to a new study.

Breath analysis may prove to be an accurate, noninvasive way to quickly determine the severity of bacterial and other infections, according to a UC Irvine study appearing online today in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

Related Articles


Employing a chemical analysis method developed for air pollution testing, UC Irvine microbiologists and chemists were able to correlate inflammation levels in laboratory mice to the amount of naturally produced carbon monoxide and other gases in breath samples.

The findings point to human applications of this technology in emergency rooms and intensive care units, potentially augmenting or replacing blood tests.

"Breath analysis has been showing promise as a diagnostic tool in a number of chronic diseases," said Dr. Alan Barbour, professor of microbiology & molecular genetics and medicine. "This study provides the first evidence … that it can be used for rapid clinical assessment of infections, which can lead to prompt institution of effective treatments."

Barbour collaborated with UC Irvine chemist Donald Blake, utilizing a gas analysis method devised for the Rowland-Blake lab's atmospheric chemistry research, which measures the level of trace gases that contribute to local and regional air pollution. It's one of the few research groups in the world recognized for its ability to gauge precisely at the parts-per-trillion level. Previous breath sampling work by the Rowland-Blake lab has involved diabetes, cystic fibrosis and kidney failure.

Barbour believed that breath analysis could additionally be used on infections, which elicit strong inflammatory responses in the body. Several compounds, or "biomarkers," are by-products of these responses. They can be identified in blood but also detected in exhaled breath.

Studying mice with bacterial blood infections, the researchers found that increases in the severity of infection elicited significantly higher amounts of carbon monoxide in relation to carbon dioxide in breath samples, making carbon monoxide a reliable biomarker for the presence and intensity of infection. Importantly, the carbon monoxide returned to normal levels soon after an antibiotic was given.

"Using a breath analysis method like this could help physicians in the emergency room and ICU make critical decisions about serious infections more quickly than if they had to wait for blood tests to come back from the lab," Barbour said.

He and Blake will next expand their research to human breath samples. Their diagnostic method is currently under patent review.

Charlotte Hirsch, Arash Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Simone Meinardi, Eric Lewis and Azadeh Shojaee Estabragh of UC Irvine also contributed to the study, which was funded by a National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases grant to the Pacific Southwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense & Emerging Infectious Diseases (AI-065359).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Irvine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alan G. Barbour, Charlotte M. Hirsch, Arash Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Simone Meinardi, Eric R. G. Lewis, Azadeh Shojaee Estabragh, Donald R. Blake. Elevated Carbon Monoxide in the Exhaled Breath of Mice during a Systemic Bacterial Infection. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (7): e69802 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069802

Cite This Page:

University of California - Irvine. "Breath analysis reliably indicates presence, level of infection in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130801095948.htm>.
University of California - Irvine. (2013, August 1). Breath analysis reliably indicates presence, level of infection in mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 5, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130801095948.htm
University of California - Irvine. "Breath analysis reliably indicates presence, level of infection in mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130801095948.htm (accessed March 5, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Bupa is hoping to expand in India&apos;s fast-growing health insurance market, once a rule change on foreign investment is implemented. The British private healthcare group&apos;s CEO tells Grace Pascoe why it&apos;s so keen on the new opportunity. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Mobile apps are turning smartphones into a personal doctors, with users able to measure heart rate, blood pressure and even blood sugar. But will it change our behaviour? Ivor Bennett reports from the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) AbbVie announced Wednesday it will buy cancer drugmaker Pharmacyclics in a $21 billion deal. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toddlers Drinking Coffee? Why You Shouldn't Share Your Joe

Toddlers Drinking Coffee? Why You Shouldn't Share Your Joe

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) A survey of Boston mothers and toddlers found that 15 percent of two-year-olds drink coffee and 2.5 percent of 1-year-olds. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins