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New robotic intubation device snakes its way safely into lungs

Date:
August 8, 2013
Source:
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Summary:
A robotic intubation device that automatically identifies the lungs using an infrared source and navigates toward it has been developed. Clinical trials will begin as soon as next year, possibly paving the path toward the future of intubation.
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Graduates of the Hebrew University's Biodesign program revealed a robotic intubation device that automatically identifies the lungs using an infrared source and navigates toward it. The device was successfully tested on cadavers at Hadassah Medical Center, and clinical trials will begin as soon as next year. "I strongly believe that GuideIn Tube represents the future of intubation," said Dr. Elchanan Fried, director of Hadassah Medical Center's general intensive care unit and the group's clinical expert.

Intubation is the placement of a plastic tube into the lungs that allows anesthetized or critically ill patients to breathe. The current procedure requires the physician to see the trachea and choose between two very similar holes, one leading to the lungs, the other to the stomach. Failure to identify the correct hole can lead to patient death. Worse, intubation sometimes has to be carried out in the field, during military operations, or on patients that have blood or liquids obstructing the way.

This month, graduates of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Biodesign program revealed a prototype called GuideIN Tube. GuideIN Tube is a robotic intubation device that automatically identifies the lungs using an infrared source and navigates toward it. The device was successfully tested on cadavers at the Hadassah Medical Center, and clinical trials will begin as soon as next year.

"I strongly believe that GuideIn Tube represents the future of intubation," said Dr. Elchanan Fried, director of the general intensive care unit in Hadassah Medical Center, and the group's clinical expert. The device targets a $3 billion market, which is expected to increase by 5% annually. "We really thought about the paramedic in the field," said Itai Hayut, the leading engineering student on the project. "We wanted something simple and compact that they could trust without fail. I think we hit it on all marks."

For a video demonstrating the new device, see: http://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=133559&CultureCode=en


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Hebrew University of Jerusalem. "New robotic intubation device snakes its way safely into lungs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130808123721.htm>.
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. (2013, August 8). New robotic intubation device snakes its way safely into lungs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130808123721.htm
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. "New robotic intubation device snakes its way safely into lungs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130808123721.htm (accessed July 2, 2015).

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