Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Process devised for ultrathin carbon membranes

Date:
August 22, 2013
Source:
Universitaet Bielefeld
Summary:
Scientists have succeeded in developing a new path to produce carbon nanomembranes. In the future, such membranes are expected to be able to filter out very fine materials. The advantage of the new method of fabrication is that it allows a variety of different carbon nanomembranes to be generated which are much thinner than conventional membranes.

Using a new process the team working with Professor Dr. Armin Gölzhäuser has produced twelve different nanomembranes. The three images were made using the Bielefeld Helium Ion Microscope and show nanomembranes made from various starting materials.
Credit: Bielefeld University

A research team working with Professor Dr. Armin Gölzhäuser of Bielefeld University has succeeded in developing a new path to produce carbon nanomembranes. In the future, such membranes are expected to be able to filter out very fine materials. The advantage of the new method of fabrication is that it allows a variety of different carbon nanomembranes to be generated which are much thinner than conventional membranes.

The upcoming issue of the  research journal ACS Nano reports on this research success.

In the future, carbon nanomembranes are expected to be able to filter out very fine materials. These separating layers are ultrathin, consisting of just one layer of molecules. In the long term, they could allow to separate gases from one another, for example, filtering toxins from the air. At present, the basic research is concerned with the production of nanomembranes. A research team working with Professor Dr. Armin Gölzhäuser of Bielefeld University has succeeded in developing a new path to produce such membranes. The advantage of this procedure is that it allows a variety of different carbon nanomembranes to be generated which are much thinner than conventional membranes. 

More than ten years ago, Professor Gölzhäuser and his then team created the groundwork for the current development, producing a carbon nanomembrane from biphenyl molecules. In the new study, the process was altered so as to allow the use of other starting materials. The prerequisite is that these molecules are also equipped with several so-called phenyl rings. For their new method, the researchers use the starting material in powder form. They dissolve the powder to pure alcohol and immerse very thin metal layer in this solution. After a short time the dissolved molecules settle themselves on the metal layer to form a monolayer of molecules. After being exposed to electron irradiation, the monolayer becomes a cross-linked nanomembrane. Subsequently the researchers ensure that the metal layer disintegrates, leav-ing only the nanomembrane remaining. 'Up until now, we have produced small samples which are are a few centimetres square', says Gölzhäuser. 'However, with this process it is possible to make nanomembranes that are as big as square metres.'

This new method is so special because the researchers can produce made-to-measure nanomembranes. 'Every starting material has a different property, from thickness or trans-parency to elasticity. By using our process, these characteristics are transferred onto the nanomembrane.' In this way, carbon nanomembranes can be produced to address many dif-ferent needs. 'That was not possible before now', says Gölzhäuser.

Furthermore, graphene can be made from nanomembranes. Researchers worldwide are ex-pecting graphene to have technically revolutionising properties, as it has an extremely high tensile strength and can conduct electricity and heat very well. The conversion from nanomembranes into graphene is simple for the Bielefeld researchers: The membranes have to be heated in a vacuum at a temperature of about 700 degrees Celsius. Gölzhäuser's team is working on the project with physicists from Ulm University, Frankfurt University and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research. The study has been funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the German Research Foundation (DFG).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Universitaet Bielefeld. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Polina Angelova, Henning Vieker, Nils-Eike Weber, Dan Matei, Oliver Reimer, Isabella Meier, Simon Kurasch, Johannes Biskupek, Dominik Lorbach, Katrin Wunderlich, Long Chen, Andreas Terfort, Markus Klapper, Klaus Müllen, Ute Kaiser, Armin Gölzhäuser, Andrey Turchanin. A Universal Scheme to Convert Aromatic Molecular Monolayers into Functional Carbon Nanomembranes. ACS Nano, 2013; 130709130344004 DOI: 10.1021/nn402652f

Cite This Page:

Universitaet Bielefeld. "Process devised for ultrathin carbon membranes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130822103540.htm>.
Universitaet Bielefeld. (2013, August 22). Process devised for ultrathin carbon membranes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130822103540.htm
Universitaet Bielefeld. "Process devised for ultrathin carbon membranes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130822103540.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

AP (July 18, 2014) — The Obama administration approved the use of sonic cannons to discover deposits under the ocean floor by shooting sound waves 100 times louder than a jet engine through waters shared by endangered whales and turtles. (July 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Newsy (July 18, 2014) — The wreckage of the German submarine U-166 has become clearly visible for the first time since it was discovered in 2001. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Reuters - US Online Video (July 17, 2014) — President Barak Obama stopped by at a lunch counter in Delaware before making remarks about boosting the nation's infrastructure. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

TheStreet (July 16, 2014) — Oil Futures are bouncing back after tumbling below $100 a barrel for the first time since May yesterday. Jeff Grossman is the president of BRG Brokerage and trades at the NYMEX. Grossman tells TheStreet the Middle East is always a concern for oil traders. Oil prices were pushed down in recent weeks on Libya increasing its production. Supply disruptions in Iraq fading also contributed to prices falling. News from China's economic front showing a growth for the second quarter also calmed fears on its slowdown. Jeff Grossman talks to TheStreet's Susannah Lee on this and more on the Energy Department's Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins