Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Gene combinations and interactions affect risk of Crohn's disease

Date:
August 22, 2013
Source:
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Summary:
A statistical model accounting for dozens of different genes in combination is an important step forward in understanding the genetic factors affecting the risk of Crohn's disease.

A statistical model accounting for dozens of different genes in combination -- and the interactions between them -- is an important step forward in understanding the genetic factors affecting the risk of Crohn's disease (CD), reports a study in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Related Articles


It's not just how many risk genes are present but how those genes interact with each other that determines the inheritance of CD risk, suggests the report by a research group from the Cleveland Clinic and University of Pittsburgh. The study is the first to show that information on genetic interactions can improve the ability to predict CD risk and explain its genetic heritability.

New Model of 'Cumulative Genetic Effects and Interactions' Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease affecting up to 700,000 Americans. Although the exact cause is unknown, CD appears to result from an "inappropriate persistent immune response." In addition to genetics, microbial and environmental factors likely play important roles in the development of CD.

Using modern genetic research methods, called genomewide association studies (GWAS), researchers have identified at least 71 genes that appear to affect CD risk. However, individual genes have only small effects on CD risk. Even after accounting for the combined effects of CD risk genes, less than one-fourth of CD heritability can be explained.

To address this issue, the researchers developed a new model exploring "higher-order genetic interactions" among known CD risk genes. The model was designed to evaluate not only the additive effects of having multiple CD risk genes, but also the possible impact of interactions between genes.

Using data from two large genomewide association studies of CD patients, the model showed "good CD risk predictability." People with a higher "cumulative allele score" -- reflecting more CD risk genes present -- were at higher risk of having CD. However, there wasn't a major difference in the average total risk score for patients with CD versus healthy people. Based on combinations of risk genes only, the model's ability to explain genetic inheritance of CD was 24 percent.

But after information of potential interactions between genes were added to the model, explained heritability increased to 27 percent. A model of interactions among five particularly important risk genes was confirmed using an independent patient dataset.

While an increase of three percentage points may seem small, the new results show that heritability is related not only to the number of CD risk genes present but also to the interactions among them. The researchers hope their model will contribute to understanding the genetic contribution to CD risk.

They plan further studies to confirm the model's performance in larger groups of patients. In addition, future studies will attempt to pinpoint the specific interactions occurring between CD risk genes -- and possibly to identify environmental factors that interact with genes in contributing to the development of CD.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ming-Hsi Wang, Claudio Fiocchi, Stephan Ripke, Xiaofeng Zhu, Richard H. Duerr, Jean-Paul Achkar. A Novel Approach to Detect Cumulative Genetic Effects and Genetic Interactions in Crohn’s Disease. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 2013; 1 DOI: 10.1097/MIB.0b013e31828706a0

Cite This Page:

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. "Gene combinations and interactions affect risk of Crohn's disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130822122528.htm>.
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. (2013, August 22). Gene combinations and interactions affect risk of Crohn's disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130822122528.htm
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. "Gene combinations and interactions affect risk of Crohn's disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130822122528.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) — In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's Different About This Latest Ebola Vaccine

What's Different About This Latest Ebola Vaccine

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) — A whole virus Ebola vaccine has been shown to protect monkeys exposed to the virus. Here&apos;s what&apos;s different about this vaccine. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) — Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he will bring additional state resources to help stop the epidemic. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins