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Balloon-borne astronomy experiment X-Calibur racing to hit wind window

Date:
September 13, 2013
Source:
Washington University in St. Louis
Summary:
In a few days, a balloon-borne telescope sensitive to the polarization of high-energy “hard” X-rays will ascend to the edge of the atmosphere above Fort Sumner, N.M. Once aloft, the telescope will stare at black holes, neutron stars and other exotic astronomical objects that shine brightly in the X-ray part of the spectrum in order to learn about their nature and structure. After years of preparation, the X-Calibur team is racing to get the experiment mission-ready in time for the stratospheric wind event they hope to ride.

The X-ray telescope InFOCuS in the NASA hangar at the Fort Sumner Municipal Airport. An X-ray mirror (the object in the background, left, that looks like a jet engine intake) concentrates X-rays onto the WUSTL polarimeter, situated directly behind Matthias Beilicke (left) and Fabian Kislat.
Credit: Image courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis

In a few days, a balloon-borne telescope sensitive to the polarization of high-energy "hard" X-rays will ascend to the edge of the atmosphere above Fort Sumner, N.M., to stare fixedly at black holes and other exotic astronomical objects.

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When X-Calibur, as the polarimeter is called, looks to the skies, it will see things that have never been seen before because it is looking at characteristics of high-energy light that astronomers are just beginning to explore.

X-Calibur differs from other instruments in that it can measure the polarization degree and direction of X-rays, which provide information not available in other ways. For example, when it looks at black holes and their plasma outflows, it will be able to tell how fast the black holes are spinning.

"Whenever you look at the sky at a different wavelength, you see something completely different," said Henric Krawczynski, PhD, professor of physics in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and principal investigator of the X-Calibur experiment.

The beauty of balloon flights is that they can be used to test new instruments like X-Calibur at very low cost, but the drama of them is that the experiment flies at the mercy of the wind.

X-Calibur, like other experiments flown from NASA's Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Fort Sumner, has to catch a ride on what is called a stratospheric turnaround event.

At mid-latitudes, stratospheric winds reverse direction twice each year: in the early spring and in late summer. If the winds are favorable, the balloon will travel west in the morning and return east in the evening.

"This way you can put it in the air for 30 hours, if you're lucky," Krawczynski said. If the wind doesn't turn around, the balloon flight will be short. When balloons drift outside the allowed operational area, flight safety officers fire guillotines that separate the parachute from the balloon, dropping the payload.

What could possibly go wrong? The WUSTL polarimeter will be carried aloft by an X-ray pointing telescope, called InFOCuS, that was designed and built by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

A team of 15 people is working 12-hour days -- essentially living in the NASA hangar at Fort Sumner -- to make sure the telescope will be ready on time to catch the favorable winds.

One crucial task is to make sure the X-rays are concentrated on the center of the polarimeter, which is 8 meters from the mirror. The two components have to be aligned within one-sixtieth of a degree or the X-rays either won't hit the collimator at the center of the polarimeter or they'll hit it off-axis, both of which are bad, Krawczynski said.

"The X-rays are hitting the collimator but a bit off to one side. We still need to tilt the mirror by half an arc-minute or so to focus the beam on the center of the collimator," he said.

Everything else has to be carefully checked out as well. A reaction wheel that has worked for 25 years has suddenly started to wobble and must be replaced. And difficulties arose when the telescope was rotated through 90 degrees in the NASA hangar that hadn't been apparent when it was rotated through 30 degrees in the lab.

But in fact, Krawczynski isn't so much worried as excited. "When something doesn't work, we have to troubleshoot and try to figure out what to do. It's detective work, which is fun," he said.

"I'm pretty confident we'll make the window for these turnaround flights," he said during a brief return to St. Louis. "It looks like we'll be ready in the middle of the window, but maybe we can make up a few days' time."

Armchair observers can watch near-real-time video of the launch at the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility. While the balloon is aloft, it will be tracked on a Google Earth map​. X-Calibur is a team effort. Washington University in St. Louis, led by Henric Krawczynski, is in charge of the X-ray polarimeter and overall mission; NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, led by Scott Barthelmy, a WUSTL graduate, is responsible for the gondola, X-ray telescope and the pointing system; the X-ray mirror and star trackers were contributed by Nagoya University in Japan; Gianluigi De Geronimo of Brookhaven National Laboratory oversees the electronic components; and Guarino Engineering Services the mechanical ones.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Washington University in St. Louis. The original article was written by Diana Lutz. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Washington University in St. Louis. "Balloon-borne astronomy experiment X-Calibur racing to hit wind window." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 September 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130913185843.htm>.
Washington University in St. Louis. (2013, September 13). Balloon-borne astronomy experiment X-Calibur racing to hit wind window. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130913185843.htm
Washington University in St. Louis. "Balloon-borne astronomy experiment X-Calibur racing to hit wind window." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130913185843.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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