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The mysterious scarab beetles: Two new species of the endangered ancient genus Gyronotus

Date:
October 22, 2013
Source:
Pensoft Publishers
Summary:
Famous as the sacred beetles of ancient Egypt the scarab beetle group in fact represents much greater diversity around the globe. Scientists discover two new species of the ancient and highly important from a conservation point of view genus Gyronotus.

This image shows a living G. perissinottoi in its natural habitat.
Credit: Lynette Clennell; CC-BY 3.0

Famous as the sacred beetles of ancient Egypt the scarab beetle group in fact represents much greater diversity around the globe. Some of the most vulnerable representatives are contained in the flightless genus Gyronotus, which currently includes six known species. A recent study published in the open access journal Zookeys describes two new species with unusual distribution from southern Africa.

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The two new species G. perissinottoi and G. schuelei both dwell in grasslands/savannas, while most of the other known species in the genus exhibit a preference for forest habitats. G. perissinottoi occurs in a small but biodiversity unique area in southern KwaZulu-Natal, in the beautiful Umthamvuna Nature Reserve. The second species, G. schuelei originates from western Swaziland and is currently known only from two specimens.

The representatives of the genus Gyronotus as well as several other genera of the tribe Canthonini, are regarded among the most endangered of the African Scarabaeinae because of their sensitivity to disturbance. Apart from G. glabrosus and the two newly described beetles, Gyronotus species are linked to coastal and low-lying forest habitats, which have undergone massive transformation during the past 50 years, through clearance, degradation and fragmentation.

"The genus Gyronotus is part of the tribe Canthonini, which has long been recognised as a relict of the ancient supercontinent Gondwanaland. Members of the genus are also wingless and particularly vulnerable to environmental disturbance. Thus, they are undoubtedly of substantial biodiversity and conservation value, with status ranging from vulnerable to critically endangered,"comment the authors of the study Dr. Moretto and Dr. Perissinotto.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pensoft Publishers. The original story is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Philippe Moretto, Renzo Perissinotto. Description and ecology of two new species of Gyronotus van Lansberge, 1874 (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae) from southern Africa. ZooKeys, 2013; 344: 73 DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.344.6101

Cite This Page:

Pensoft Publishers. "The mysterious scarab beetles: Two new species of the endangered ancient genus Gyronotus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131022113545.htm>.
Pensoft Publishers. (2013, October 22). The mysterious scarab beetles: Two new species of the endangered ancient genus Gyronotus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131022113545.htm
Pensoft Publishers. "The mysterious scarab beetles: Two new species of the endangered ancient genus Gyronotus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131022113545.htm (accessed April 19, 2015).

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