Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Treat gun violence as a public health problem, say physicians

Date:
October 28, 2013
Source:
Pennsylvania Medical Society
Summary:
Gun violence is a significant public health problem and further research into the epidemiology of risks related to gun violence should be conducted, experts say.

Gun violence is a significant public health problem, according to members of the Pennsylvania Medical Society, and research should be conducted to better understand its sources and causes from a medical perspective so that it can be properly addressed.

That's the outcome of a passed resolution at the Pennsylvania Medical Society's annual House of Delegates meeting in Hershey on October 26-27 in which more than 200 physicians from across the state participated.

The issue was presented by the York County Medical Society.

"Unfortunately, gun violence claims 30,000 lives per year and injures many more across the country," says Bruce A. MacLeod, MD, president of the Pennsylvania Medical Society and a practicing emergency medicine physician in Pittsburgh. "Equally unfortunate is the fact that gun violence research is grossly underfunded, and we don't understand all the reasons why it happens."

According to Dr. MacLeod, the lack of research makes it difficult to develop a successful plan to disrupt gun violence and thus work to address the issue through medical channels.

"Some studies suggest we spend as much as $100 billion a year on this problem including efforts of our criminal justice system," says Dr. MacLeod, "but very little is spent on research that could make a difference."

As such, members of the Pennsylvania Medical Society are urging politicians and the public to support research that looks at the incidence and prevalence of gun violence as well as its sources and causes.

"With more information, particularly from a public health point of view, we might be able to reduce deaths and injury caused by gun violence without disrupting the rights of gun owners and the intent of the Second Amendment," Dr. MacLeod concludes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pennsylvania Medical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Pennsylvania Medical Society. "Treat gun violence as a public health problem, say physicians." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131028100859.htm>.
Pennsylvania Medical Society. (2013, October 28). Treat gun violence as a public health problem, say physicians. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131028100859.htm
Pennsylvania Medical Society. "Treat gun violence as a public health problem, say physicians." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131028100859.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Some Positive Ebola News: Outbreak 'Contained' In Nigeria

Some Positive Ebola News: Outbreak 'Contained' In Nigeria

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) The CDC says a new case of Ebola has not been reported in Nigeria for more than 21 days, leading to hopes the outbreak might be nearing its end. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN Ebola Mission Head: Immediate Action Is Crucial

UN Ebola Mission Head: Immediate Action Is Crucial

AFP (Sep. 30, 2014) The newly appointed head of the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER), Anthony Banbury, outlines operations to tackle the virus. Duration: 00:39 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Confirms First Case of Ebola in US

CDC Confirms First Case of Ebola in US

AP (Sep. 30, 2014) The CDC has confirmed the first diagnosed case of Ebola in the United States. The patient is being treated at a Dallas hospital after traveling earlier this month from Liberia. (Sept. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Breast Cancer Drug Extends Lives In Clinical Trial

New Breast Cancer Drug Extends Lives In Clinical Trial

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) In a clinical trial, breast cancer patients lived an average of 15 months longer when they received new drug Perjeta along with Herceptin. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins