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Medication adherence after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome

Date:
November 18, 2013
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
Patients better adhered to their medication regimens in the year following hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome when they were part of a program that included personalized attention from a pharmacist compared with usual care, according to a study.

Patients better adhered to their medication regimens in the year following hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) when they were part of a program that included personalized attention from a pharmacist compared with usual care, according to a study by P. Michael Ho, M.D., Ph.D., of the Denver VA Medical Center, and colleagues.

Previous studies have found that adherence to cardioprotective drug regimens is poor after patients are discharged from the hospital, with one-third of patients discontinuing at least one medication by mouth by one month.

Researchers randomized 253 patients from four Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers in Denver, Seattle, Durham, N.C., and Little Rock, Ark., to usual care or an intervention that included direct contact with a pharmacist to discuss medications shortly after discharge, patient education, collaboration between a patient's pharmacist and physician, and voice messaging reminders. The intervention cost about $360 per patient.

The study was completed by 241 patients (122 in the intervention and 119 in usual care) and researchers measured the proportion of patients adhering to their medication regimens, along with the proportion achieving blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level targets.

Study findings indicate the intervention increased adherence to mediation regimens (89.3 percent in the intervention vs. 73.9 percent in the usual care group) but there was no difference in the proportion of patients who achieved BP and LDL-C level goals.

"Additional studies are needed to understand the impact of the magnitude of adherence improvement shown in our study on clinical outcomes prior to broader dissemination of such an adherence program," the authors conclude.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. P. Michael Ho, Anne Lambert-Kerzner, Evan P. Carey, Ibrahim E. Fahdi, Chris L. Bryson, S. Dee Melnyk, Hayden B. Bosworth, Tiffany Radcliff, Ryan Davis, Howard Mun, Jennifer Weaver, Casey Barnett, Anna Barσn, Eric J. Del Giacco. Multifaceted Intervention to Improve Medication Adherence and Secondary Prevention Measures After Acute Coronary Syndrome Hospital Discharge. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2013; 1 DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.12944

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. "Medication adherence after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131118111907.htm>.
The JAMA Network Journals. (2013, November 18). Medication adherence after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131118111907.htm
The JAMA Network Journals. "Medication adherence after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131118111907.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

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