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Cancer researchers translate new findings to enhance melanoma treatment

Date:
November 21, 2013
Source:
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences
Summary:
Drugs called BRAF inhibitors shrink most melanoma tumors quickly. Despite good responses, melanoma tumors do not shrink away completely. Left-behind cancer cells allow tumors to grow back drug resistant. However, using Multiple drugs that simultaneously target the different tumor resistance mechanisms may prevent drug resistance and tumor regrowth.

Approximately 40 percent of advanced melanoma tumors -- the deadliest form of skin cancer, which can spread throughout the body -- are driven to grow by the presence of BRAF mutations. New drugs called BRAF inhibitors have shown unprecedented responses as a treatment for these types of tumors, rapidly shrinking them. However, BRAF-mutated tumors frequently show early resistance to treatment and respond only partially to BRAF inhibitors, leaving behind cancer cells that lead to eventual tumor regrowth.

Translational researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center (JCCC) have published results of two back-to-back studies in the journal Cancer Discovery that provide critical insights into two key areas of how tumors resist BRAF inhibitors: the key cell-signaling pathways BRAF-mutant melanoma cells use to learn how to become resistant to inhibitor drugs, and how the limited focus of BRAF inhibitors allows melanoma cells to evolve and develop drug resistance. The studies were published online ahead of print on November 21, 2013.

Led by Dr. Roger Lo, JCCC member and associate professor and director of the melanoma clinic in dermatology, these two studies utilized patient biopsy samples to give researchers powerful information that can be translated directly into the clinic, specifically to improve the use of BRAF inhibitor drugs in combination with other potential drugs for melanoma patients.

In the first study, Dr. Lo and colleagues discovered how tumor cells escaped the effects of BRAF inhibitors, based on the outgrowth of melanoma cells that had learned from different cell-signaling pathways how to become BRAF-inhibitor resistant. This work was based on the analysis of 100 biopsies from patients treated with BRAF inhibitors, and it highlights that BRAF inhibitor-resistant tumors use a variety of different signaling routes to learn resistance. Remarkably, a single patient could have more than one of these resistance routes.

As doctors learn what these mechanisms of tumor resistance are, they can combine inhibitor drugs that block multiple resistance routes and eventually make the tumors shrink for much longer, or go away completely.

"By helping us understand the core resistance pathways and tumor heterogeneity, fitness and mutational patterns that emerge under drug selection." Lo said. "This study lays a foundation for clinical trials to investigate the mechanisms of tumor progression in these melanoma patients."

The second study, also led by Lo, found that as soon as melanomas face BRAF inhibitors they are able to quickly turn on drug resistance pathways (a process called early adaptive resistance). Over time, these early adaptive resistance pathways are further fortified, allowing the tumor cells to break free of the BRAF inhibitor and resume growth. Therefore, early and late resistance processes are linked and the endgames can be quite similar although the means or mechanisms to these ends may be different. Discovering the common denominator or core melanoma escape pathways is an important conceptual advance when fighting BRAF inhibitor resistance.

"We now have a landscape view of how melanoma first adapts and then finds ways to overcome what is initially a very effective treatment" said Antoni Ribas, JCCC member and professor of medicine co-investigator in these articles. "We have already incorporated this knowledge to the testing of new combination treatments in patients to get us back ahead of melanoma and not allow it to escape."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. H. Shi, W. Hugo, X. Kong, A. Hong, R. C. Koya, G. Moriceau, T. Chodon, R. Guo, D. B. Johnson, K. B. Dahlman, M. C. Kelley, R. F. Kefford, B. Chmielowski, J. A. Glaspy, J. A. Sosman, N. van Baren, G. V. Long, A. Ribas, R. S. Lo. Acquired Resistance and Clonal Evolution in Melanoma during BRAF Inhibitor Therapy. Cancer Discovery, 2013; DOI: 10.1158/2159-8290.CD-13-0642

Cite This Page:

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences. "Cancer researchers translate new findings to enhance melanoma treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131121103609.htm>.
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences. (2013, November 21). Cancer researchers translate new findings to enhance melanoma treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131121103609.htm
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences. "Cancer researchers translate new findings to enhance melanoma treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131121103609.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

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