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Blocking antioxidants in cancer cells reduces tumor growth in mice

Date:
December 2, 2013
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
Researchers report the effects of a SOD1 pharmacological inhibitor on non-small-cell lung cancer cells.
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Many cancers have adapted to cope with high levels of immune system-produced free radicals, also referred to as reactive oxygen species, by overproducing antioxidant proteins. One of these proteins, superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), is overproduced in lung adenocarcinomas and has been implicated as a target for chemotherapy.

In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Navdeep Chandel and colleagues from Northwestern University report the effects of a SOD1 pharmacological inhibitor on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. The inhibitor, called ATN-224, stunted the growth of human NSCLC cells in culture and induced their death. The researchers also found that ATN-224 inhibited other antioxidant proteins, which caused high levels of hydrogen peroxide inside the cells. The ability of cancer cells to produce hydrogen peroxide was required for ATN-224-dependent effects, because hydrogen peroxide activated cell death pathways.

Furthermore, ATN-224 induced cancer cell death and reduced tumor sizes in a mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma. ATN-224 dependent effects in animals were improved when the inhibitor was used in combination with another drug that activates programmed cell death.

This study suggests inhibition of antioxidants may be a viable chemotherapeutic option.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andrea Glasauer, Laura A. Sena, Lauren P. Diebold, Andrew P. Mazar, Navdeep S. Chandel. Targeting SOD1 reduces experimental non–small-cell lung cancer. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2013; DOI: 10.1172/JCI71714

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Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Blocking antioxidants in cancer cells reduces tumor growth in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202121451.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2013, December 2). Blocking antioxidants in cancer cells reduces tumor growth in mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202121451.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Blocking antioxidants in cancer cells reduces tumor growth in mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202121451.htm (accessed August 2, 2015).

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