Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Promising Alzheimer's drug trialled in large EU study

Date:
December 9, 2013
Source:
University of Gothenburg
Summary:
An extensive European study is currently investigating whether a drug used to treat high blood pressure may also help patients with Alzheimer's disease.

An extensive European study is currently investigating whether a drug used to treat high blood pressure may also help patients with Alzheimer's disease. The EU is investing almost 6 million euros on the project, in which Sahlgrenska Academy and Sahlgrenska University Hospital are responsible for Sweden's contribution.

Related Articles


The drug being trialled in the study, nilvadipine, is a well-proven treatment for high blood pressure. Research has shown that nilvadipine counters the formation of amyloid plaques in animal brains.

The drug is now to be trialled with 500 Alzheimer's patients in nine European countries.

"Should this clinical trial be successful, nilvadipine would become the first Alzheimer's drug that not only reduces the symptoms of the disease but also acts on its causes. This could dramatically reduce Europe's costs for caring for patients with this neurodegenerative disease," says Anne Börjesson-Hanson, a researcher at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, who is leading the Swedish participation in the study.

The patients in the study will be treated with nilvadipine or a placebo (inactive substance) for eighteen months. Patients who are already being treated with drugs to relieve the symptoms of Alzheimer's will continue to take them as before. Follow-up and check-ups will be carried out at the memory clinic at Sahlgrenska University Hospital.

"We will carry out repeated tests on the patients to see whether there are changes in memory and cognition during the trial period," says Anne Börjesson-Hanson.

This major European research collaboration is called NILVAD, and is being coordinated from Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland. Research teams in the UK, France, Netherlands, Greece, Hungary, Italy and Germany are taking part alongside Ireland and Sweden.

For further information about the project, see: www.nilvad.eu


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Gothenburg. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Gothenburg. "Promising Alzheimer's drug trialled in large EU study." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131209105022.htm>.
University of Gothenburg. (2013, December 9). Promising Alzheimer's drug trialled in large EU study. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131209105022.htm
University of Gothenburg. "Promising Alzheimer's drug trialled in large EU study." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131209105022.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Monday, January 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Technology Is Ruining Snow Days For Students

How Technology Is Ruining Snow Days For Students

Newsy (Jan. 25, 2015) — More schools are using online classes to keep from losing time to snow days, but it only works if students have Internet access at home. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weird Things Couples Do When They Lose Their Phone

Weird Things Couples Do When They Lose Their Phone

BuzzFeed (Jan. 24, 2015) — Did you back it up? Do you even know how to do that? Video provided by BuzzFeed
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) — A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Amazing Technology Allows Blind Mother to See Her Newborn Son

Amazing Technology Allows Blind Mother to See Her Newborn Son

RightThisMinute (Jan. 23, 2015) — Not only is Kathy seeing her newborn son for the first time, but this is actually the first time she has ever seen a baby. Kathy and her sister, Yvonne, have been legally blind since childhood, but thanks to an amazing new technology, eSight glasses, which gives those who are legally blind the ability to see, she got the chance to see the birth of her son. It&apos;s an incredible moment and an even better story. Video provided by RightThisMinute
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins