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Atlas Mountains in Morocco buoyed up by superhot rock, study finds

Date:
January 2, 2014
Source:
University of Southern California
Summary:
The Atlas Mountains defy the standard model for mountain structure in which high topography must have deep roots for support, according to a new study from Earth scientists.

The Atlas Mountains defy the standard model for mountain structure in which high topography must have deep roots for support, according to a new study from Earth scientists at USC.

In a new model, the researchers show that the mountains are floating on a layer of hot molten rock that flows beneath the region's lithosphere, perhaps all the way from the volcanic Canary Islands, just offshore northwestern Africa.

"Our findings confirm that mountain structures and their formation are far more complex than previously believed," said lead author Meghan Miller, assistant professor of Earth sciences at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

The study, coauthored by Thorsten Becker, professor of Earth sciences at USC Dornsife, was published by Geology on Jan. 1, 2014 and highlighted by Nature Geoscience.

A well-established model for Earth's lithosphere suggests that the height of Earth's crust must be supported by a commensurate depth, much like how a tall iceberg doesn't simply float on the surface of the water but instead rests on a large submerged mass of ice. This property is known as "istostacy."

"The Atlas Mountains are at present out of balance, likely due to a confluence of existing lithospheric strength anomalies and deep mantle dynamics," Becker said.

Miller and Becker used seismometers to measure the thickness of the lithosphere -- that is, Earth's rigid outermost layer -- beneath the Altas Mountains in Morocco. By analyzing 67 distant seismic events with 15 seismometers, the team was able to use Earth's vibrations to "see" into the deep subsurface.

They found that the crust beneath the Atlas Mountains, which rise to an elevation of more than 4,000 meters, reaches a depth of only about 35 km -- about 15 km shy of what the traditional model predicts.

"This study shows that deformation can be observed through the entire lithosphere and contributes to mountain building even far away from plate boundaries" Miller said.

Miller's lab is currently conducting further research into the timing and effects of the mountain building on other geological processes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Southern California. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. S. Miller, T. W. Becker. Reactivated lithospheric-scale discontinuities localize dynamic uplift of the Moroccan Atlas Mountains. Geology, 2013; DOI: 10.1130/G34959.1

Cite This Page:

University of Southern California. "Atlas Mountains in Morocco buoyed up by superhot rock, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140102133630.htm>.
University of Southern California. (2014, January 2). Atlas Mountains in Morocco buoyed up by superhot rock, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140102133630.htm
University of Southern California. "Atlas Mountains in Morocco buoyed up by superhot rock, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140102133630.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

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