Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Colonoscopy withdrawal times linked to polyp detection rates

Date:
January 21, 2014
Source:
Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers find a statistically significant correlation between longer normal withdrawal time and higher (overall) polyp detection rates, adenoma detection rates, and serrated polyp detection rates.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center (NCCC) researchers found that longer withdrawal times during a colonoscopy correlates with a higher rate of polyp detection. The study was recently published online in in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

"There has been controversy over whether longer withdrawal times could lead to detection of increased numbers of polyps of various types," said Lynn F. Butterly, MD, director of Colorectal Cancer Screening at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and NCCC, and associate professor of Medicine at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. "Since the rate of discovery of polyps is a critical quality measure for colonoscopy, examining whether or not there is an association between withdrawal time and finding more polyps may contribute evidence leading to improved quality in screening through colonoscopy."

During a colonoscopy, a lighted tube (colonoscope) is passed through the colon to find and remove polyps. The colonoscope is passed to the area where the large and small intestine meet, and the scope is then slowly withdrawn back through the colon, carefully examining the lining. The time spent in withdrawing the scope and doing a detailed examination is called the withdrawal time.

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer in the US, but CRC is preventable through screening. Most CRC begins as a small growth on the lining of the colon, known as a polyp. Over a period of several years, some polyps may turn into cancer.

Using data from the New Hampshire Colonoscopy Registry (NHCR), the authors examined how endoscopists' withdrawal time in normal, well-prepped colonoscopies affected their polyp detection rates. They analyzed 7,996 colonoscopies performed in 7,972 patients between 2009 and 2011 by 42 endoscopists at 14 hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, and community practices. Polyp detection rates were calculated based on median withdrawal time in normal exams.

"Our investigation demonstrates a statistically significant correlation between longer normal withdrawal time and higher (overall) polyp detection rates, adenoma detection rates, and serrated polyp detection rates, and provides strong evidence to support a 9-minute median normal withdrawal time as a quality standard," Butterly said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lynn Butterly, Christina M Robinson, Joseph C Anderson, Julia E Weiss, Martha Goodrich, Tracy L Onega, Christopher I Amos, Michael L Beach. Serrated and Adenomatous Polyp Detection Increases With Longer Withdrawal Time: Results From the New Hampshire Colonoscopy Registry. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/ajg.2013.442

Cite This Page:

Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. "Colonoscopy withdrawal times linked to polyp detection rates." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121130030.htm>.
Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. (2014, January 21). Colonoscopy withdrawal times linked to polyp detection rates. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121130030.htm
Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. "Colonoscopy withdrawal times linked to polyp detection rates." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121130030.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 23, 2014) The WHO has warned up to 20,000 people could be infected with Ebola over the next few weeks. As Sonia Legg reports, the implications for the West African countries suffering from the disease are huge. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million Within 4 Months

Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million Within 4 Months

Newsy (Sep. 23, 2014) Health officials warn that without further intervention, the number of Ebola cases in Liberia and Sierra Leone could reach 1.4 million by January. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Ebola Cases to Triple in Weeks Without Drastic Action

WHO: Ebola Cases to Triple in Weeks Without Drastic Action

AFP (Sep. 23, 2014) The number of Ebola infections will triple to 20,000 by November, soaring by thousands every week if efforts to stop the outbreak are not stepped up radically, the WHO warned in a study on Tuesday. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
5 Ways Men Can Prevent Most Heart Attacks

5 Ways Men Can Prevent Most Heart Attacks

Newsy (Sep. 23, 2014) No surprise here: A recent study says men can reduce their risk of heart attack by maintaining a healthy lifestyle, which includes daily exercise. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins