Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Simple, at-home test will detect most colorectal cancers

Date:
February 3, 2014
Source:
Kaiser Permanente
Summary:
Tests that require patients to collect a single stool sample at home and then send it to a lab for analysis will detect about 79 percent of colorectal cancers, according to a new evidence review. The review of 19 studies examining eight different fecal immunochemical tests, know as "FITs", also finds that the tests will correctly identify about 94 percent of patients who do not have cancers of the rectum or colon.

Take home FITs test for colon cancer screening.
Credit: KP

Tests that require patients to collect a single stool sample at home and then send it to a lab for analysis will detect about 79 percent of colorectal cancers, according to a new evidence review published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The review of 19 studies examining eight different fecal immunochemical tests, know as "FITs," also finds that the tests will correctly identify about 94 percent of patients who do not have cancers of the rectum or colon.

"We know the FIT is easy to use, and now we also know that it is a great tool for assessing which patients have cancer and which patients don't," said Beth Liles, MD, review co-author and clinical investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yet one in three adults is not adequately screened.

"FIT is simple, can be done at home, and can save lives," said Jeffrey Lee, MD, MAS, the study's lead author and post-doctoral researcher at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, Calif. and University of California, San Francisco. "The American Cancer Society and other professional organizations have recommended FIT as a screening tool for colorectal cancer since 2008, but there are still many people who don't know about it."

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that people with normal risk for colorectal cancer should begin screening at age 50 and end at age 75. Unlike older stool tests, FIT does not require people to restrict their diets or to stop taking medications. Conducted annually, the test detects small amounts of blood in the stool, and people who test positive are much more likely to have colorectal cancer. People who have a positive FIT need a follow-up colonoscopy to look for cancer or pre-cancerous polyps.

Other screening options for colorectal cancer include sigmoidoscopy, which involves physical examination of the lower colon, recommended every five years; or colonoscopy, which examines the entire colon, every 10 years.

Review Details:

The evidence review, funded by the National Institutes of Health, found that the FITs were fairly sensitive. On average, the tests detected 79 percent, or about 4 of 5 cancers with only one round of testing. The tests were also highly specific: on average, 94 percent of people who did not have cancer tested negative with a single FIT.

By comparison, studies indicate that another at-home test called fecal occult blood test (also known as FOBT) detects only about 13 to 50 percent of cancers after a single round of testing. The FOBT is the predecessor to FIT and requires three stool samples as well as medication and dietary restrictions.

According to the evidence review, no single FIT performed markedly better than another, but the authors caution that there was only one study comparing brands head-to-head. Most of the FITs required collection of only one stool sample. Surprisingly, the authors found that brands requiring two or three stool samples were no more accurate than those requiring only one sample.

The 19 studies reviewed included between 80 and 27,860 patients, with the average age ranging from 45 to 63. Study settings varied, but all included patients with no symptoms of colorectal cancer. In 12 of the studies, all patients took the FIT and received a colonoscopy. In seven studies, patients only had a colonoscopy to follow-up on a positive FIT. Approximately two years later, researchers followed up with patients who had had a negative FIT to determine whether they had been diagnosed with colorectal cancer.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Kaiser Permanente. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jeffrey K. Lee, Elizabeth G. Liles, Stephen Bent, Theodore R. Levin, Douglas A. Corley. Accuracy of Fecal Immunochemical Tests for Colorectal Cancer. Annals of Internal Medicine, 2014; 160 (3): 171-181 DOI: 10.7326/M13-1484

Cite This Page:

Kaiser Permanente. "Simple, at-home test will detect most colorectal cancers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140203191800.htm>.
Kaiser Permanente. (2014, February 3). Simple, at-home test will detect most colorectal cancers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140203191800.htm
Kaiser Permanente. "Simple, at-home test will detect most colorectal cancers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140203191800.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Tens of thousands of doses of experimental Ebola vaccines could be available for "real-world" testing in West Africa as soon as January as long as they are deemed safe in soon to start trials, the World Health Organization said Tuesday. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins