Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Breast cancer survivors reap benefits of weight training, study finds

Date:
February 13, 2014
Source:
Florida State University
Summary:
Researchers are working with breast cancer survivors to help them regain muscle mass and bone density lost through both chemotherapy and the aging process.

Tallahassee resident Jennie Simons couldn't even reach over her head by the time she had finished her breast cancer treatment in 2008. She was a survivor, beating back a particularly aggressive case of breast cancer -- first in 2000 and then again in 2008 when it recurred -- but the chemotherapy left her body ravaged.

She had 15 surgeries during the breast reconstruction process, plus additional surgeries on her spine and arms because the chemo had weakened her bones so much that they started chipping away.

"I couldn't reach over my head," said Simons, 63. "I couldn't reach my back to bathe it."

So, in 2010 when she heard about a new study at Florida State University that was working with postmenopausal breast cancer survivors by putting them on a weight training regime, she signed up.

Said Simons: "At the end of six months, I was lifting a lot of weights. It helped me mentally and physically."

Through that study, researchers at Florida State University and other institutions found that if you put female breast cancer survivors on a weight training program and fed them prunes, they could at least maintain their current levels of muscle mass and bone density. The findings were published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism.

"If we can prevent that decrease, that's a step in the right direction, " said Lynn Panton, associate professor of exercise science and a co-author of the study.

Now, Panton and one of her doctoral students, Titch Madzima, are following up on that research, recruiting another group of women to participate in a study that involves personal training with Madzima and other graduate students twice per week, followed by consumption of a vanilla bean-flavored protein drink.

Simons signed up again. So for the next three months, Madzima is taking her through leg presses, bicep curls, leg extensions and other exercises in a small laboratory on the FSU campus that is outfitted with a small gym. It's a total body workout.

Panton and Madzima are trying to find out if they tweak the approach from the first study if they can eventually reverse the effects of the chemotherapy and help women gain back some lost muscle mass and bone density.

"If we can slow down that accelerated loss or reverse that process, hopefully we'll improve the quality of life of the breast cancer survivor," Madzima said.

And while the ultimate goal is to find a solid program for breast cancer survivors to follow on a larger scale, the university researchers are also helping local women through the process of recovery.

"Working with the ladies is amazing," Panton said. "We almost become a family. We've done a number of parties, a potluck."

Study participant Nancy Van Wilder, who was diagnosed in 2009 right after her 50th birthday, said that cancer was a "kick in the butt" and having a support group from women who have gone through the same treatment and ultimate recovery is essential.

Van Wilder said she participated in the original study in 2010 to get back into shape so she could run a 5K for breast cancer research. She wound up running nine races that year.

Working out alongside the other women, plus Panton and her graduate students was key to that, she said. So she, like Simons, is also back for the new study.

"They just inspired me," she said. "I feel very strongly about the research they're doing."

Panton and Madzima are enrolling women in the study on an ongoing basis. For more information, contact Madzima at tamadzima@admin.fsu.edu. Women must be 40 and older, postmenopausal and breast cancer survivors.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Florida State University. The original article was written by Kathleen Haughney. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Emily Simonavice, Pei-Yang Liu, Jasminka Z. Ilich, Jeong-Su Kim, Bahram Arjmandi, Lynn B. Panton. The effects of a 6-month resistance training and dried plum consumption intervention on strength, body composition, blood markers of bone turnover, and inflammation in breast cancer survivors1. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 2013; 1 DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2013-0281

Cite This Page:

Florida State University. "Breast cancer survivors reap benefits of weight training, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140213112620.htm>.
Florida State University. (2014, February 13). Breast cancer survivors reap benefits of weight training, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140213112620.htm
Florida State University. "Breast cancer survivors reap benefits of weight training, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140213112620.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins