Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Physics in 3-D? That's nothing: Try 0-D

Date:
March 4, 2014
Source:
University of Cincinnati
Summary:
Zero-dimensional quantum dots could someday have a big effect on a variety of technologies, such as solar energy, lasers and medical diagnostics. This latest discovery is all about going small, but its significance is anything but. The research team's ability to control the confinement energy by varying the size of the quantum dot opens up a world of possibilities.

UC student Teng Shi will present her semiconductor nanowire research at the American Physical Society meeting.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Cincinnati

In physics, there's small, and then there's nullity -- as in zero-dimensional. University of Cincinnati researchers have reached this threshold with a special structure that may someday lead to better ways of harnessing solar energy, stronger lasers or more sensitive medical diagnostic devices.

Related Articles


These structures are semiconductor nanowires. UC doctoral student Teng Shi says she and a team of researchers have observed unique optical signatures indicating that electronic excitations within these nanowires can be confined to a zero-dimensional state called a "quantum dot."

This latest discovery is all about going small, but its significance is anything but. The research team's ability to control the confinement energy by varying the size of the quantum dot opens up a world of possibilities.

"Exploring the basic physics of semiconductor nanowires enables one to envision applications or to design structures for applications," says Shi of UC's Department of Physics. "These structures are potential candidates for a variety of applications including photovoltaics, lasers and ultra-sensitive nanosensors."

Shi will present the team's research "Temperature-dependent Photoluminescence Imaging of GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostructure Quantum Well Tubes" at the American Physical Society (APS) meeting to be held March 3-7 in Denver. Nearly 10,000 professionals, scholars and students will attend the APS meeting to discuss new research from industry, universities and laboratories from around the world.

This research advances work previously done on semiconductor nanowires at UC. By using a thin shell called a quantum well tube and growing it -- to about 4 nanometers thick -- around the nanowire core, researchers found electrons within the nanowire were distributed in an unusual way in relation to the facets of the hexagonal tube. The result is a quantum wire, like a long string many times thinner than a human hair.

Now they've taken things even further, going from one-dimensional wires to zero-dimensional quantum dots. These little structures could have a big effect on a variety of technologies. Semiconductors are at the center of modern electronics. Computers, TVs and cellphones have them. They're made from the crystalline form of elements that have scientifically beneficial electrical conductivity properties. Many semiconductors are made of silicon, but gallium arsenide is used in this research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cincinnati. The original article was written by Tom Robinette. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Cincinnati. "Physics in 3-D? That's nothing: Try 0-D." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304125848.htm>.
University of Cincinnati. (2014, March 4). Physics in 3-D? That's nothing: Try 0-D. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304125848.htm
University of Cincinnati. "Physics in 3-D? That's nothing: Try 0-D." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304125848.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Jaguar Land Rover Opens $800 Million Factory in Britain

Jaguar Land Rover Opens $800 Million Factory in Britain

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) British luxury car manufacturer Jaguar Land Rover opened a $800 million engine manufacturing centre in western England, creating 1,400 jobs. Duration: 00:45 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
SkyCruiser Concept Claims to Solve Problem With Flying Cars

SkyCruiser Concept Claims to Solve Problem With Flying Cars

Buzz60 (Oct. 30, 2014) A start-up company called Krossblade says its SkyCruiser concept flying car solves the problem with most flying car concepts. Mara Montalbano (@maramontalbano) explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 29, 2014) A Swedish amputee who became the first person to ever receive a brain controlled prosthetic arm is able to manipulate and handle delicate objects with an unprecedented level of dexterity. The device is connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles, giving him the ability to control it with his thoughts. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots Get Funky on the Dance Floor

Robots Get Funky on the Dance Floor

AP (Oct. 29, 2014) Dancing, spinning and fighting robots are showing off their agility at "Robocomp" in Krakow. (Oct. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins