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Mutations in leukemia gene linked to new childhood growth disorder

Date:
March 9, 2014
Source:
Institute of Cancer Research
Summary:
Mutations in a gene associated with leukemia cause a newly described condition that affects growth and intellectual development in children, new research reports. A study identified mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene, DNMT3A, in 13 children.

Mutations in a gene associated with leukemia cause a newly described condition that affects growth and intellectual development in children, new research reports.

A study led by scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, identified mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene, DNMT3A, in 13 children.

All the children were taller than usual for their age, shared similar facial features and had intellectual disabilities. The mutations were not present in their parents, nor in 1,000 controls from the UK population.

The new condition has been called 'DNMT3A overgrowth syndrome'.

The research is published today in the journal Nature Genetics and is a part of the Childhood Overgrowth Study, which is funded by the Wellcome Trust, and aims to identify causes of developmental disorders that include increased growth in childhood. The DNMT3A gene is crucial for development because it adds the 'methylation' marks to DNA that determine where and when genes are active.

Intriguingly, DNMT3A mutations are already known to occur in certain types of leukemia. The mutations that occur in leukemia are different from those in DNMT3A overgrowth syndrome and there is no evidence that children with DNMT3A mutations are at increased risk of cancer.

Researchers at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), with colleagues at St George's, University of London, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, and genetics centres across Europe and the US, identified the mutations after analysing the genomes of 152 children with overgrowth disorders and their parents.

Study leader Professor Nazneen Rahman, Head of Genetics and Epidemiology at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, and Head of Cancer Genetics at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, said: "Our findings establish DNMT3A mutations as the cause of a novel human developmental disorder and add to the growing list of genes that appear to have dual, but distinct, roles in human growth disorders and leukemias."

The new discovery is of immediate value to the families in providing a reason for why their child has had problems. Moreover, because the mutations have arisen in the child and have not been inherited from either parent, the risk of another child in the family being similarly affected is very low. This is very welcome news for families.

Study co-leader Dr Katrina Tatton-Brown, Clinical Researcher at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, and Consultant Geneticist at St George's, University of London, said: "Having a diagnosis can make a real difference to families -- I recently gave the result back to one of the families in which we identified a DNMT3A mutation and they greatly appreciated having a reason for their daughter's condition after many years of uncertainty."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Institute of Cancer Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Katrina Tatton-Brown, Sheila Seal, Elise Ruark, Jenny Harmer, Emma Ramsay, Silvana Del Vecchio Duarte, Anna Zachariou, Sandra Hanks, Eleanor O'brien, Lise Aksglaede, Diana Baralle, Tabib Dabir, Blanca Gener, David Goudie, Tessa Homfray, Ajith Kumar, Daniela T Pilz, Angelo Selicorni, I Karen Temple, Lionel Van Maldergem, Naomi Yachelevich, Childhood Overgrowth Consortium, Robert Van Montfort & Nazneen Rahman. Mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene DNMT3A cause an overgrowth syndrome with intellectual disability. Nature Genetics, March 2014 DOI: 10.1038/ng.2917

Cite This Page:

Institute of Cancer Research. "Mutations in leukemia gene linked to new childhood growth disorder." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140309150542.htm>.
Institute of Cancer Research. (2014, March 9). Mutations in leukemia gene linked to new childhood growth disorder. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140309150542.htm
Institute of Cancer Research. "Mutations in leukemia gene linked to new childhood growth disorder." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140309150542.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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