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More osteoarthritis noted later in life in kids who have ACL reconstruction

Date:
March 15, 2014
Source:
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM)
Summary:
Adolescents who have an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life, researchers have discovered. “Early reconstruction of ACLs is often the trend for young more skeletally mature athletes to restore knee stability and prevent progressive meniscal and/or articular cartilage damage. Often these procedures do allow individuals to return to the playing field and continue an active lifestyle. However, it is still important to evaluate long-term effects such as osteoarthritis when considering surgeries for these pediatric patients,” said the lead researcher.
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Researchers presented results today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day in New Orleans that adolescents who have an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life.

“Long-term follow-ups after the surgical treatment of ACL injuries in kids are rare and this is one of the few studies that has been able to track individuals,” said Olle Mansson, MD, lead author of the study from NU-Hospital Group in Uddevalla, Sweden.

The study assessed 32 patients, aged 12-16 years old, 10-20 years after their initial ACL reconstruction that used bone-patellar bone-tendon or hamstring tendon autograft. Twenty-nine patients underwent clinical, radiographical and health-related quality of life assessments after 10-20 years (mean 175 months). The results revealed significant osteoarthritic changes on the reconstructed knee (65%) compared to the non-involved knee (14%). Quality of life and other health related scores were the same or comparable to those seen in healthy controls.

“Early reconstruction of ACLs is often the trend for young more skeletally mature athletes to restore knee stability and prevent progressive meniscal and/or articular cartilage damage. Often these procedures do allow individuals to return to the playing field and continue an active lifestyle. However, it is still important to evaluate long-term effects such as osteoarthritis when considering surgeries for these pediatric patients,” said Mansson.


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The above story is based on materials provided by American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). "More osteoarthritis noted later in life in kids who have ACL reconstruction." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140315092905.htm>.
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). (2014, March 15). More osteoarthritis noted later in life in kids who have ACL reconstruction. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140315092905.htm
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). "More osteoarthritis noted later in life in kids who have ACL reconstruction." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140315092905.htm (accessed May 25, 2015).

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