Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New role discovered for enzyme could have implications for cancer, neurologic disease

Date:
March 31, 2014
Source:
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Summary:
A new function discovered for a long-studied enzyme could have implications for the diagnosis and treatment of some cancers and neurological disease, new research shows. The work involves superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1), an enzyme that for nearly half a century has been known to remove a specific radical byproduct created during the energy-producing process of cell metabolism.

X.F. Steven Zheng, PhD, and colleagues show that when cells have a high content of ROS byproducts and are under oxidative stress, the Sod1 enzyme helps to remove other types of ROS byproducts in addition to superoxides by controlling the production of many different types of antioxidants in a process called transcription.
Credit: Image courtesy of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey shows that a new function discovered for a long-studied enzyme could have implications for the diagnosis and treatment of some cancers and neurological disease.

Related Articles


The work involves superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1), an enzyme that for nearly half a century has been known to remove a specific radical byproduct created during the energy-producing process of cell metabolism. This 'superoxide' byproduct comes from a family of byproducts known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). These byproducts can modify fats, proteins and DNA in a chemical reaction called oxidation, causing these biological molecules to lose functions. Low levels of these byproducts can cause normal cells to become cancerous. At higher levels, cell death and damage to tissues and organs can occur.

In the study, published in the current edition of Nature Communications, X.F. Steven Zheng, PhD, and colleagues show that when cells have a high content of ROS byproducts and are under oxidative stress, the Sod1 enzyme helps to remove other types of ROS byproducts in addition to superoxides by controlling the production of many different types of antioxidants in a process called transcription. Investigators found that this action is enabled through the Sod1's communication with a protein known as ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) that acts as a tumor suppressor and a neurological disease protein. ATM senses elevated ROS byproduct levels in the cell and activates the transcriptional function of Sod1.

Dr. Zheng, who is the senior author of the work and co-director of the Cancer Pharmacology and Preclinical Therapeutics Program at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey notes the latter finding explains why ATM and Sod1 share common traits in some cancers and neurological disorders. For instance, Sod1 plays a key role in the development of liver and lung cancer. It also accounts for 20 percent of inherited cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- or Lou Gehrig's disease. Sod1 also is associated with a vision-loss disorder known as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic complications.

"In identifying this new role for Sod1 in helping to control oxidative stress response, we can better understand the relationship between Sod1 and ATM and their collective impact on ROS byproducts," notes Zheng, who also is a university professor at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. "Further research in this area could have considerable implications in the diagnosis and treatment of Sod1-related diseases such as ALS and cancer."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Chi Kwan Tsang, Yuan Liu, Janice Thomas, Yanjie Zhang, X. F. S. Zheng. Superoxide dismutase 1 acts as a nuclear transcription factor to regulate oxidative stress resistance. Nature Communications, 2014; 5 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms4446

Cite This Page:

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. "New role discovered for enzyme could have implications for cancer, neurologic disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140331083605.htm>.
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. (2014, March 31). New role discovered for enzyme could have implications for cancer, neurologic disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140331083605.htm
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. "New role discovered for enzyme could have implications for cancer, neurologic disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140331083605.htm (accessed November 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins