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Brain steroids make good dads: Fish study provides insight

Date:
May 19, 2014
Source:
Georgia State University
Summary:
Insights from a highly social fish can help understand how other androgenic steroids, like testosterone, can shape a male's parenting skills. Once bluebanded gobies become fathers, they stay close to the developing eggs, vigorously fan and rub them until they hatch, and also protect them from mothers who would eat them.

Testosterone in males is generally associated with aggression and definitely not with good parenting. Insights from a highly social fish can help understand how other androgenic steroids, like testosterone, can shape a male's parenting skills, according to a recent Georgia State University research study.

Once bluebanded gobies become fathers, they stay close to the developing eggs, vigorously fan and rub them until they hatch, and also protect them from mothers who would eat them. By injecting a series of chemicals into the brains of these fathers, the research team temporarily altered their brain androgens and also their level of parental care. As a result, the researchers found that brain androgens actually promote good parenting.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Georgia State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. D. S. Pradhan, T. K. Solomon-Lane, M. C. Willis, M. S. Grober. A mechanism for rapid neurosteroidal regulation of parenting behaviour. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2014; 281 (1786): 20140239 DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0239

Cite This Page:

Georgia State University. "Brain steroids make good dads: Fish study provides insight." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140519160755.htm>.
Georgia State University. (2014, May 19). Brain steroids make good dads: Fish study provides insight. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140519160755.htm
Georgia State University. "Brain steroids make good dads: Fish study provides insight." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140519160755.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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