Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Racehorses: Equine nasal strip reduces lung damage, may improve performance

Date:
May 21, 2014
Source:
Kansas State University
Summary:
The Flair nasal strip was tested by researchers who found the product reduced lung hemorrhaging in horses by about 50 percent. Unlike humans, horses only breathe through their nose. When a horse breathes, it can generate a negative pressure in its lungs. High-intensity activities like races, combined with a narrow nasal passageway, put extra pressure on the horse and often result in a hemorrhage in the lungs.

As debate continues on the decision to allow California Chrome to wear a nasal strip in the Belmont Stakes, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine researchers who tested the product say the focus should be on the nasal strip's health benefits and not on possible performance enhancement.

The university's Howard Erickson, professor emeritus of anatomy and physiology, and David Poole, professor of kinesiology and anatomy and physiology, researched the Flair nasal strip used by the thoroughbred racehorse and found it can help reduce lung damage in horses.

"I think the Flair nasal strip was beneficial for this horse, and the Flair nasal strip has been shown by our research to reduce exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage by approximately 50 percent. I think that is beneficial," Erickson said.

Unlike humans, horses only breathe through their nose. Poole said that when a horse breathes, it can generate a negative pressure in its lungs. High-intensity activities like races, combined with a narrow nasal passageway, put extra pressure on the horse and often result in a hemorrhage in the lungs. The Flair nasal strip is designed to alleviate that.

Poole says he was skeptical of the product when approached by manufacturers. Poole and Erickson conducted a randomized, control study on seven geldings trained to run on a treadmill. The nasal strip is designed to tent the airway and hold it open. Results showed that the nasal strip did improve the airway, leading to reduced lung damage.

"The nasal strip reduces bleeding, reduces the secondary infections that can damage the lung afterward and also may help facilitate the horse to perform better," Poole said.

The researchers say the nasal strip may improve performance because it reduces fatigue. They believe this is a more honest approach to racing enhancements and a better alternative than some drugs currently being used.

"Unfortunately, the horse racing industry is a mine of drugs," Poole said. "You don't know under any given circumstances what a horse may or may not be on."

The Flair nasal strips are being used worldwide at other horse events like barrel racing.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Kansas State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Kansas State University. "Racehorses: Equine nasal strip reduces lung damage, may improve performance." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140521101841.htm>.
Kansas State University. (2014, May 21). Racehorses: Equine nasal strip reduces lung damage, may improve performance. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140521101841.htm
Kansas State University. "Racehorses: Equine nasal strip reduces lung damage, may improve performance." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140521101841.htm (accessed July 27, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge from Nest

Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge from Nest

AP (July 27, 2014) A live-streaming webcam catches loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings emerging from a nest in the Florida Keys. (July 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A U.S. doctor has tested positive for the deadly Ebola virus, as the worst-ever outbreak continues to grow. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The New York Times Backs Pot Legalization

The New York Times Backs Pot Legalization

Newsy (July 27, 2014) The New York Times has officially endorsed the legalization of marijuana, but why now, and to what end? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins