Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Smokers with gene defect have one in four chance of developing lung cancer

Date:
June 1, 2014
Source:
Institute of Cancer Research
Summary:
Around a quarter of smokers who carry a defect in the BRCA2 gene will develop lung cancer at some point in their lifetime, a large-scale, international study reveals. Scientists announce a previously unknown link between lung cancer and a particular BRCA2 defect, occurring in around 2 per cent of the population.

Around a quarter of smokers who carry a defect in the BRCA2 gene will develop lung cancer at some point in their lifetime, a large-scale, international study reveals.
Credit: © Dmytro Tolokonov / Fotolia

Around a quarter of smokers who carry a defect in the BRCA2 gene will develop lung cancer at some point in their lifetime, a large-scale, international study reveals.

Related Articles


Scientists announce a previously unknown link between lung cancer and a particular BRCA2 defect, occurring in around 2 per cent of the population, in research published in Nature Genetics today (Sunday).

The defect in BRCA2 -- best known for its role in breast cancer -- increases the risk of developing lung cancer by about 1.8 times.

Smokers as a group have a high lifetime risk of around 13 per cent (16 per cent in men and 9.5 per cent in women). The new study therefore suggests around one in four smokers with the BRCA2 defect will develop lung cancer.

Around 10 million adults in Great Britain smoke, which means that up to around 200,000 adult smokers could have the specific BRCA2 defect, known as BRCA2 c.9976T.

The researchers, led by a team at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, compared the DNA of 11,348 Europeans with lung cancer and 15,861 without the disease, looking for differences at specific points in their DNA. The team was mainly funded by the US National Institute of Health, with additional support from Cancer Research UK

The link between lung cancer and defective BRCA2 -- known to increase the risk of breast, ovarian and other cancers -- was particularly strong in patients with the most common lung cancer sub-type, called squamous cell lung cancer. The researchers also found an association between squamous cell lung cancer and a defect in a second gene, CHEK2, which normally prevents cells from dividing when they have suffered damage to their DNA.

The results suggest that in the future, patients with squamous cell lung cancer could benefit from drugs specifically designed to be effective in cancers with BRCA mutations. A family of drugs called PARP inhibitors have shown success in clinical trials in breast and ovarian cancer patients with BRCA mutations, although it is not known whether they could be effective in lung cancer.

Study leader Professor Richard Houlston, Professor of Molecular and Population Genetics at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), said: "Our study showed that mutations to two genes, BRCA2 and CHEK2, have a very large effect on lung cancer risk in the context of smoking. Mutated BRCA2 in particular seems to increase risk by around 1.8 times.

"Smokers in general have nearly a 15 per cent chance of developing lung cancer, far higher than in non-smokers. Our results show that some smokers with BRCA2 mutations are at an enormous risk of lung cancer -- somewhere in the region of 25 per cent over their lifetime.

"Lung cancer claims more than a million lives a year worldwide and is by far the biggest cancer killer in the UK. We know that the single biggest thing we can do to reduce death rates is to persuade people not to smoke, and our new findings make plain that this is even more critical in people with an underlying genetic risk."

Professor Paul Workman, Deputy Chief Executive of The Institute of Cancer Research, said: "These findings indicate that around a quarter of smokers with a specific defect in their BRCA2 gene will develop lung cancer -- a disease which is almost invariably fatal. All smokers are taking a considerable risk with their health, regardless of their genetic profile, but the odds are stacked even more heavily against those with this genetic defect who smoke."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Institute of Cancer Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Yufei Wang, James D McKay, Thorunn Rafnar, Zhaoming Wang, Maria N Timofeeva, Peter Broderick, Xuchen Zong, Marina Laplana, Yongyue Wei, Younghun Han, Amy Lloyd, Manon Delahaye-Sourdeix, Daniel Chubb, Valerie Gaborieau, William Wheeler, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Patrick Sulem, Geoffrey Liu, Rudolf Kaaks, Marc Henrion, Ben Kinnersley, Maxime Vallée, Florence LeCalvez-Kelm, Victoria L Stevens, Susan M Gapstur, Wei V Chen, David Zaridze, Neonilia Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Jolanta Lissowska, Peter Rudnai, Eleonora Fabianova, Dana Mates, Vladimir Bencko, Lenka Foretova, Vladimir Janout, Hans E Krokan, Maiken Elvestad Gabrielsen, Frank Skorpen, Lars Vatten, Inger Njølstad, Chu Chen, Gary Goodman, Simone Benhamou, Tonu Vooder, Kristjan Välk, Mari Nelis, Andres Metspalu, Marcin Lener, Jan Lubiński, Mattias Johansson, Paolo Vineis, Antonio Agudo, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Kay-Tee Khaw, Mikael Johansson, Elisabete Weiderpass, Anne Tjønneland, Elio Riboli, Mark Lathrop, Ghislaine Scelo, Demetrius Albanes, Neil E Caporaso, Yuanqing Ye, Jian Gu, Xifeng Wu, Margaret R Spitz, Hendrik Dienemann, Albert Rosenberger, Li Su, Athena Matakidou, Timothy Eisen, Kari Stefansson, Angela Risch, Stephen J Chanock, David C Christiani, Rayjean J Hung, Paul Brennan, Maria Teresa Landi, Richard S Houlston, Christopher I Amos. Rare variants of large effect in BRCA2 and CHEK2 affect risk of lung cancer. Nature Genetics, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/ng.3002

Cite This Page:

Institute of Cancer Research. "Smokers with gene defect have one in four chance of developing lung cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140601150808.htm>.
Institute of Cancer Research. (2014, June 1). Smokers with gene defect have one in four chance of developing lung cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140601150808.htm
Institute of Cancer Research. "Smokers with gene defect have one in four chance of developing lung cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140601150808.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) — Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins