Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Boost for dopamine packaging protects brain in Parkinson's model

Date:
June 17, 2014
Source:
Emory Health Sciences
Summary:
An increase in the protein that helps store dopamine, a critical brain chemical, led to enhanced dopamine neurotransmission and protection from a Parkinson's disease-related neurotoxin in mice in a recent study. Dopamine and related neurotransmitters are stored in small storage packages called vesicles by the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2). When released from these packages dopamine can help regulate movement, pleasure, and emotional response.

Researchers from Emory's Rollins School of Public Health discovered that an increase in the protein that helps store dopamine, a critical brain chemical, led to enhanced dopamine neurotransmission and protection from a Parkinson's disease-related neurotoxin in mice.

Dopamine and related neurotransmitters are stored in small storage packages called vesicles by the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2). When released from these packages dopamine can help regulate movement, pleasure, and emotional response. Low dopamine levels are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and recent research has shown that VMAT2 function is impaired in people with the disease.

Lead researcher Gary W. Miller, PhD, professor and associate dean for research at the Rollins School of Public Health and his team generated transgenic mice with increased levels of VMAT2 and found it led to an increase in dopamine release. In addition, the group found improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive behaviors, increased movement, and protection from MPTP, the chemical that can cause Parkinson's disease-related damage in the brain.

The complete study is available in the June 17, 2014 edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

According to Miller, "This work suggests that enhanced vesicular filling can be sustained over time and may be a viable therapeutic approach for a variety of central nervous system disorders that involve the storage and release of dopamine, serotonin, or norepinephrine."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Emory Health Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K. M. Lohr, A. I. Bernstein, K. A. Stout, A. R. Dunn, C. R. Lazo, S. P. Alter, M. Wang, Y. Li, X. Fan, E. J. Hess, H. Yi, L. M. Vecchio, D. S. Goldstein, T. S. Guillot, A. Salahpour, G. W. Miller. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1402134111

Cite This Page:

Emory Health Sciences. "Boost for dopamine packaging protects brain in Parkinson's model." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617102927.htm>.
Emory Health Sciences. (2014, June 17). Boost for dopamine packaging protects brain in Parkinson's model. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617102927.htm
Emory Health Sciences. "Boost for dopamine packaging protects brain in Parkinson's model." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617102927.htm (accessed September 29, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Monday, September 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Research from Washington University suggest people with conscientious spouses have greater career success. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Researchers say certain markers in the blood can predict risk of psychosis later in the life. The test can aid in early treatment for the condition. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

AP (Sep. 25, 2014) Teri Tacheny, a harpist, has a loyal following of fans who appreciate her soothing music. Every month, gorillas, orangutans and monkeys amble down to hear her play at the Como Park Zoo in Minnesota. (Sept. 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Alzheimer's Researchers Watching Early Forgetfulness

Alzheimer's Researchers Watching Early Forgetfulness

Newsy (Sep. 25, 2014) This development gives scientists a chance to detect memory issues earlier, even if larger issues aren't showing on cognitive tests. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins