Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

People who are obese or former smokers more likely to follow recommended statin therapy

Date:
June 23, 2014
Source:
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Summary:
Lifestyle factors can help predict whether people will adhere to statin therapy for high cholesterol, a new study suggests. Among people without heart disease and diabetes, those who are overweight, obese or former smokers are more likely to adhere to statin therapy. People with cardiovascular comorbidities, heavy drinkers and extreme drinkers (people who passed out from alcohol consumption) were substantially more likely to be nonadherent than nondrinkers.

A new study suggests that lifestyle factors can help predict whether people will adhere to statin therapy for high cholesterol. Among people without heart disease and diabetes, those who are overweight, obese or former smokers are more likely to adhere to statin therapy, according to an article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Related Articles


Almost 1 in 10 cardiovascular events can be linked to nonadherence to prescribed medication. Studies indicate that nonadherence with statin therapy can be as high as 46%.

To determine whether lifestyle influences statin adherence, researchers looked at data on 11,949 people involved in the Finnish Public Sector Study who had started statin therapy after the survey, between 1998 and 2010. Of these, 928 responded to a survey about health status and lifestyle factors. Nonadherence to statin medication was more common in women, younger people (24 to 50 years old) and single people. People who did not have cardiovascular disease, obesity, overweight or a history of smoking -- that is, people in decent health -- were less likely to take statins as directed.

"As expected, patients with a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes had better adherence to statin therapy than those without these comorbidities," writes Dr. Heli Halava, Departments of Public Health and Pharmacology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland, with coauthors. "Because of their increased risk of cardiovascular events, patients with comorbidities likely have a strong perception of the need for statin treatment."

People with cardiovascular comorbidities, heavy drinkers and extreme drinkers (people who passed out from alcohol consumption) were substantially more likely to be nonadherent than nondrinkers.

"Heavy drinkers may intentionally avoid taking mediation because of potential drug-alcohol interactions, they may unintentionally miss doses or even refills because of intoxication, or they may simply be less concerned about missing doses," write the authors.

The finding that people with weight issues and a history of smoking are more likely to follow the recommended therapy can provide valuable insights about how people will take preventive medications.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Canadian Medical Association Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. H. Halava, M. J. Korhonen, R. Huupponen, S. Setoguchi, J. Pentti, M. Kivimaki, J. Vahtera. Lifestyle factors as predictors of nonadherence to statin therapy among patients with and without cardiovascular comorbidities. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2014; DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.131807

Cite This Page:

Canadian Medical Association Journal. "People who are obese or former smokers more likely to follow recommended statin therapy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140623131157.htm>.
Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2014, June 23). People who are obese or former smokers more likely to follow recommended statin therapy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140623131157.htm
Canadian Medical Association Journal. "People who are obese or former smokers more likely to follow recommended statin therapy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140623131157.htm (accessed October 26, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

AFP (Oct. 25, 2014) — An American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Toxin-Packed Stem Cells Used To Kill Cancer

Newsy (Oct. 25, 2014) — A Harvard University Research Team created genetically engineered stem cells that are able to kill cancer cells, while leaving other cells unharmed. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins