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Blocking cells' movement to stop spread of cancer

Date:
July 7, 2014
Source:
University College London
Summary:
Insights into how cells move through the body could lead to innovative techniques to stop cancer cells from spreading and causing secondary tumors, finds new research. Scientists discovered that cells can change into an invasive, liquid-like state to readily navigate the narrow channels in our body. This transformation is triggered by chemical signals, which could be blocked in order to stop cancer cells from spreading.

Migrating embryonic neural crest cells. In this image, the cells are stained red for cell protrusion, yellow for cell membrane and blue for nucleus.
Credit: Prof. R. Mayor

Insights into how cells move through the body could lead to innovative techniques to stop cancer cells from spreading and causing secondary tumors, according to new UCL research.

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Scientists discovered that cells can change into an invasive, liquid-like state to readily navigate the narrow channels in our body. This transformation is triggered by chemical signals, which could be blocked in order to stop cancer cells from spreading.

Most cancer deaths are not due to primary tumors, but to secondary tumors in vital organs, such as the lungs or brain, caused by cells moving from the original tumor to other places in the body.

The study led by UCL researchers and published today in the Journal of Cell Biology, used embryonic cells to investigate how groups of cells move in a developmental process similar to that used by cancer to spread around the body.

The team report a molecule called lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) changes cells from a solid-like to a liquid-like state, allowing cells to flow between normal tissues in the body. Scientists were able to switch off the signals from LPA, stopping the cells from moving down narrow, blood vessel-like channels.

Lead scientist Professor Roberto Mayor (UCL Cell & Developmental Biology), said: "We have found a way to stop the movement of embryonic cells by blocking LPA signals. It is likely that a similar mechanism operates during cancer invasion, which suggests a promising alternative in which cancer treatments might work in the future, if therapies can be targeted to limit the tissue fluidity of tumors.

"Our findings are important for the fields of cell, developmental and cancer biology. Previously, we thought cells only moved around the body either individually or as groups of well-connected cells. What we have discovered is a hybrid state where cells loosen their links to neighbouring cells but still move en masse together, like a liquid. Moreover, we can stop this movement."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University College London. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Kuriyama, E. Theveneau, A. Benedetto, M. Parsons, M. Tanaka, G. Charras, A. Kabla, R. Mayor. In vivo collective cell migration requires an LPAR2-dependent increase in tissue fluidity. The Journal of Cell Biology, 2014; 206 (1): 113 DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201402093

Cite This Page:

University College London. "Blocking cells' movement to stop spread of cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707092655.htm>.
University College London. (2014, July 7). Blocking cells' movement to stop spread of cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707092655.htm
University College London. "Blocking cells' movement to stop spread of cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707092655.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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