Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Combination antiretroviral therapy helps treat HCV in patients co-infected with HIV

Date:
July 23, 2014
Source:
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center
Summary:
Treatment of HIV patients co-infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an anti-retroviral drug therapy not only tackles HIV, but also reduces HCV replication, according to a new study.

Treatment of HIV patients co-infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an anti-retroviral drug therapy not only tackles HIV, but also reduces HCV replication, according to a new study. (stock image)
Credit: © photocrew / Fotolia

Treatment of HIV patients co-infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an anti-retroviral drug therapy not only tackles HIV, but also reduces HCV replication, according to a new study lead by a University of Cincinnati researcher.

Related Articles


The results were published Wednesday, July 23, 2014, in Science Translational Medicine.

Previously, physicians treating co-infected patients worried that HIV antiretroviral therapy might injure the liver to the detriment of patient health, says Kenneth Sherman, MD, PhD, Gould Professor of Medicine and Director in the UC Division of Digestive Diseases in the College of Medicine.

Literature in the 2000s seemed to support that stance, prompting Sherman and the team of researchers from UC and elsewhere to intensively study the two-year experiences of 17 patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C. The patients received already approved HIV antiretroviral drug therapies, but underwent frequent evaluation and sampling of blood so that minor changes in the virus and the immune response could be captured.

In a subset of patients there was an initial increase in serum ALT (a marker of liver injury), hepatitis C or both during the first 16 weeks. However, over a period of 18 months researchers found that viral loads for HCV returned to what was expected in a mono-infected patient suffering from HCV without HIV, says Sherman. Initial liver injury actually resulted from effective HIV treatment and not from toxicity.

"The drop in HCV viral levels was a big surprise and not what we necessarily expected," Sherman says.

In the United States, 200,000 to 300,000 people have HCV/HIV co-infection, while worldwide estimates range from 4 million to 8 million people, according to Sherman. Physicians can use Sherman's study results to better plan treatment for HIV patients co-infected with hepatitis C.

"There is a complex interaction of biological effects when patients are infected with both HIV and the hepatitis C virus," Sherman explains. "Initial response to HIV treatment results in a transient increase in HCV viral replication and evidence of liver injury. However, over time HIV suppression leads to reduced HCV replication."

"This process is highly modulated by down regulation of the interferon-responsive gene family," adds Sherman, who led the study. "The findings suggest that HIV suppression with antiretroviral medications play an important role in the management of individuals with HCV and HIV infection. It supports the concept that in those with HCV/HIV infection early and uninterrupted HIV therapy is a critical part of preventing liver disease."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K. E. Sherman, J. Guedj, M. T. Shata, J. T. Blackard, S. D. Rouster, M. Castro, J. Feinberg, R. K. Sterling, Z. Goodman, B. J. Aronow, A. S. Perelson. Modulation of HCV replication after combination antiretroviral therapy in HCV/HIV co-infected patients. Science Translational Medicine, 2014; 6 (246): 246ra98 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3008195

Cite This Page:

University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. "Combination antiretroviral therapy helps treat HCV in patients co-infected with HIV." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140723141712.htm>.
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. (2014, July 23). Combination antiretroviral therapy helps treat HCV in patients co-infected with HIV. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140723141712.htm
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. "Combination antiretroviral therapy helps treat HCV in patients co-infected with HIV." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140723141712.htm (accessed April 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

AP (Mar. 31, 2015) — Although she never had much interest in prosthetic limbs before, Faith Lennox couldn&apos;t wait to slip on her new robohand. The 7-year-old, who lost part of her left arm when she was a baby, grabbed it as soon as it came off a 3-D printer. (March 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Solitair Device Aims to Takes Guesswork out of Sun Safety

Solitair Device Aims to Takes Guesswork out of Sun Safety

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 31, 2015) — The Solitair device aims to take the confusion out of how much sunlight we should expose our skin to. Small enough to be worn as a tie or hair clip, it monitors the user&apos;s sun exposure by taking into account their skin pigment, location and schedule. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Soda, Salt and Sugar: The Next Generation of Taxes

Soda, Salt and Sugar: The Next Generation of Taxes

Washington Post (Mar. 30, 2015) — Denisa Livingston, a health advocate for the Dinι Community Advocacy Alliance, and the Post&apos;s Abby Phillip discuss efforts around the country to make unhealthy food choices hurt your wallet as much as your waistline. Video provided by Washington Post
Powered by NewsLook.com
UnitedHealth Buys Catamaran

UnitedHealth Buys Catamaran

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 30, 2015) — The $12.8 billion merger will combine the U.S.&apos; third and fourth largest pharmacy benefit managers. Analysts say smaller PBMs could also merge. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins