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Diabetes education improves health, quality of life

Date:
August 8, 2014
Source:
American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE)
Summary:
Diabetes education significantly improves outcomes among people with the condition, leading to reduced blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. The patients in a recent study worked with diabetes educators as part of their care through a holistic patient-centered medical home approach, including coordination of care between providers and culturally competent communication. More than 29 million Americans – nearly one in 10 – have diabetes, a disorder in which the body doesn’t effectively process glucose, which provides the body fuel for energy and growth.

Diabetes education significantly improves outcomes among people with the condition, leading to reduced blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, according to data presented by the Diabetes Self-Management Education Program from New York-Presbyterian Hospital today at AADE14, the American Association of Diabetes Educators Annual Meeting & Exhibition.

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In the study, 1,263 people with diabetes living in a low-income urban area with a high immigrant population received four 30-minute one-on-one sessions with diabetes educators to learn about and work on the AADE7TM Self-Care Behaviors: healthy eating, being active, monitoring, taking medication, problem solving, healthy coping and reducing risks. Additionally, they participated in group sessions with diabetes educators to help them focus on their choice of one or more of those behaviors. Good self-management of diabetes is key to decreasing the complications of the condition, including heart disease, blindness and kidney problems.

The outcomes were significant: After 15 months of working with a diabetes educator, participants on average lowered their A1C (blood sugar) levels by 67 percent and their LDL (bad) cholesterol levels by 53 percent. After receiving diabetes education, 25 percent of patients had high blood pressure, compared to 32 percent prior to the study. The A1C test measures the concentration of glucose (sugar) in the blood, a reflection of how well the diabetes is being controlled. Ideally, A1C levels should be below 7 percent; and there was a 7 percent increase in the participants who achieved this goal over the course of the study.

"Diabetes education is not only helpful, it's necessary for people with the condition. It's designed to empower patients to self-manage and reach their goals," said Lovelyamma Varghese, MS, FNP, BC, RN, and Director of Nursing Practice and quality for the Ambulatory Care Network at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York. "We've shown this program can really work. Our patient-centered approach prioritizes our patients' needs. As diabetes educators, we partner with providers, fellow dietitians and nurses, community health workers and most importantly, patients. We can go into their homes, speak their language, identify opportunities for behavioral changes, even open the fridge and see what's in there -- it's a partnership."

The patients worked with diabetes educators as part of their care through a holistic patient-centered medical home approach, including coordination of care between providers and culturally competent communication.

More than 29 million Americans -- nearly one in 10 -- have diabetes, a disorder in which the body doesn't effectively process glucose, which provides the body fuel for energy and growth. While diabetes can't be cured, it can be managed with medication and lifestyle changes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). "Diabetes education improves health, quality of life." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140808110616.htm>.
American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). (2014, August 8). Diabetes education improves health, quality of life. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140808110616.htm
American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). "Diabetes education improves health, quality of life." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140808110616.htm (accessed December 23, 2014).

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