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Beagle 2 Lander found on Mars

Date:
January 16, 2015
Source:
University of Leicester
Summary:
The Beagle 2 Mars Lander, thought lost on Mars since 2003, has been found partially deployed on the surface of the planet, ending the mystery of what happened to the mission more than a decade ago. This find shows that the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) sequence for Beagle 2 worked and the lander did successfully touchdown on Mars on Christmas Day 2003.
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Dr Tim Parker of NASA JPL who has assisted in the search and processed some of the images said: "I've been looking over the Croon objects carefully, and I'm convinced that these are Beagle 2 hardware."
Credit: HiRISE/NASA/JPL/Parker/Leicester

The UK-led Beagle 2 Mars Lander, thought lost on Mars since 2003, has been found partially deployed on the surface of the planet, ending the mystery of what happened to the mission more than a decade ago. This find shows that the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) sequence for Beagle 2 worked and the lander did successfully touchdown on Mars on Christmas Day 2003. Beagle 2 hitched a ride to Mars on ESA's Mars Express mission and was a collaboration between industry and academia. It would have delivered world-class science from the surface of the Red Planet. Many UK academic groups and industrial companies contributed to Beagle 2.

Images taken by the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and initially searched by Michael Croon of Trier, Germany, a former member of ESA's Mars Express operations team at ESOC, have identified clear evidence for the lander and convincing evidence for key entry and descent components on the surface of Mars within the expected landing area of Isidis Planitia (an impact basin close to the equator).

Since the loss of Beagle 2 following its landing on Christmas Day 2003, Michael has, in parallel with members of the Beagle 2 industrial and scientific teams, been patiently screening images from HiRISE looking for signs of Beagle 2. Subsequent re-imaging and analysis by the Beagle 2 team, HiRISE team and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has confirmed that the targets discovered, are of the correct size, shape, colour and dispersion (i.e. separation) to be Beagle 2.

The images, following analysis by members of the Beagle 2 team and NASA, show the Beagle 2 lander in what appears to be a partially deployed configuration, with what is thought to be the rear cover with its pilot/drogue chute (still attached) and main parachute close by. Due to the small size of Beagle 2 (less than 2m across for the deployed lander) it is right at the limit of detection of imaging systems (cameras) orbiting Mars. The targets are within the expected landing area at a distance of ~5km from its centre.

Several interpretations of the image of the lander have been identified, consistent with the lander's size and shape. The imaging data is however consistent with only a partial deployment following landing. This would explain why no signal or data was received from the lander -- as full deployment of all solar panels was needed to expose the RF antenna which would transmit data and receive commands from Earth.

Unfortunately given the partial deployment (and covering of the RF antenna) it would not be possible to revive Beagle 2 and recover data from it.

Dr. John Bridges of the University of Leicester who led the selection of the Beagle 2 Landing Site and commissioned as HiRISE Co-investigator the recent follow-up images said: "It's great to see Beagle 2 on Mars. This would not be possible without the high resolution and colour capabilities of the HiRISE camera on NASA's MRO where each pixel is 25 cm across. An early image of this area in Isidis was obscured by dust in the atmosphere but the more recent images have conclusive proof of the landing. The Isidis surface around Beagle is what we were planning for, with a gentle plain and some small wind-blown ridges that are a few tens of cm high. One of the positive things related to this discovery is that we are using the things we learnt from Beagle in the 2018 ExoMars Rover mission. For instance many of the Beagle2 scientists and engineers are now working on ExoMars instruments and landing site selection. "


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Materials provided by University of Leicester. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Leicester. "Beagle 2 Lander found on Mars." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 January 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150116084937.htm>.
University of Leicester. (2015, January 16). Beagle 2 Lander found on Mars. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150116084937.htm
University of Leicester. "Beagle 2 Lander found on Mars." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150116084937.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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