Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

University Of Florida Surgeons Pioneer Procedure To Prevent Incontinence After Prostate Surgery

Date:
July 31, 1997
Source:
University Of Florida
Summary:
University of Florida surgeons have suspended the bladder within the abdomen to prevent urinary incontinence in men whose cancerous prostate glands have just been removed.

By Melanie Fridl Ross

GAINESVILLE, Fla.---Using a technique akin to securing a hammock to a tree, UF surgeons have suspended the bladder within the abdomen to prevent urinary incontinence in men whose cancerous prostate glands have just been removed.

Removal of the prostate, known as radical prostatectomy, is the established treatment for managing prostate cancer that has not spread. More than 300,000 patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1996, said Dr. Perinchery Narayan, chairman of urology at UF's College of Medicine. Nearly half will undergo surgery.

Incontinence plagues as many as 1 in 4 men after prostate surgery, in part because the bladder shifts to fill the 2- to 4-centimeter space left after the gland is extracted.

"Normally we all exert tremendous pressure on the bladder when we cough, sneeze or bend over and straighten out, but there is equal pressure on the bladder neck," Narayan said. "When the neck of the bladder shifts slightly below the abdomen, as often happens after prostate surgery, the pressure of those activities gets transferred out, and patients may leak urine."

Between 3 and 5 percent of patients will have incontinence so severe it requires them to wear pads.

"The numbers are variable," Narayan said. "If you consider any incontinence at all, even a drop or two when the patient coughs or sneezes, the incidence may be as high as 25 percent of patients."

Incontinence is more severe in patients older than 70 because their muscles are naturally weak.

To combat the problem, UF surgeons have begun taking fibrous connective tissue from elsewhere in the body, wrapping it around the bladder and tying it to muscles lining the abdomen.

The approach restores some of the normal anatomy and slightly compresses the neck of the bladder, said Narayan, who pioneered the 10-minute procedure a little more than a year ago.

"A combination of a little compression and the sling effect lifting up the bladder prevents many patients from leaking urine," he said. "This appears to reduce the incidence and degree of incontinence.

"Surgeons have tried a variety of techniques to prevent or correct incontinence," he added. "These include sparing some nerves that may be involved in maintaining continence and giving injections of collagen into the urethra. But still the problem continued.

It's unpredictable prior to surgery as to who will develop incontinence. While the percentage with more severe problems may be low, these patients are very devastated by this problem."

Furthermore, of the 30 men who have undergone the procedure, all were continent immediately after surgery, Narayan said. Normally, many patients experience temporary incontinence for up to three to six months after the operation.

"The patients we've operated on have been really happy, and we've not seen other problems," said Narayan, who presented his findings at this year's American Urological Association meeting and continues to study and modify the procedure. "Over a year's follow-up, they are voiding well and are continent."

---------------------------------------------------------------

Recent UF Health Science Center news releases also are available on the UF Health Science Center Communications home page. Point your browser to http://www.vpha.health.ufl.edu/hscc/index.html


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Florida. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Florida. "University Of Florida Surgeons Pioneer Procedure To Prevent Incontinence After Prostate Surgery." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 July 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/07/970731082144.htm>.
University Of Florida. (1997, July 31). University Of Florida Surgeons Pioneer Procedure To Prevent Incontinence After Prostate Surgery. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/07/970731082144.htm
University Of Florida. "University Of Florida Surgeons Pioneer Procedure To Prevent Incontinence After Prostate Surgery." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/07/970731082144.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Doctors once thought artificial sweeteners lacked the health risks of sugar, but a new study says they can impact blood sugar levels the same way. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

AFP (Sep. 17, 2014) A healthy British volunteer is to become the first person to receive a new vaccine for the Ebola virus after US President Barack Obama called for action against the epidemic and warned it was "spiralling out of control." Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Researchers are puzzled as to why obesity rates remain relatively stable as average waistlines continue to expand. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins