Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

"Super Aspirin" Holds Long-Term Benefits For Some Patients Who Undergo Balloon Angioplasty

Date:
August 18, 1997
Source:
Thomas Jefferson University
Summary:
An intravenous "super aspirin" called abciximab (ReoPro™, Centocor, Inc., Malvern, PA) administered in the catheterization laboratory before an angioplasty can prevent platelets from sticking to arterial walls and reclogging vessels after the procedure.

While innovative techniques and catheters, including coronary stents, have dramatically improved success rates for nonsurgical coronary revascularization, complications following balloon angioplasty remain an important problem associated with mortality.

Related Articles


An intravenous "super aspirin" called abciximab (ReoPro™, Centocor, Inc., Malvern, PA) administered in the catheterization laboratory before an angioplasty can prevent platelets from sticking to arterial walls and reclogging vessels after the procedure. Results of a multicenter study published in the August 13 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) demonstrate a favorable effect on long-term outcome and survival in selected patients treated with ReoPro™.

In an editorial that accompanies the study, David L. Fischman, MD, associate professor of medicine, division of cardiology, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and associate director, cardiac catheterization laboratory at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, recognizes the vast advantages of ReoPro™ but points out that patient profiles, drug costs and other interventional alternatives are issues to consider when deciding who should receive this "super aspirin."

In his editorial, Dr. Fischman notes that the multicenter study, which is a three-year follow-up to an initial study of ReoPro™, led by Eric J. Topol, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio, shows that the benefits of ReoPro™ are greatest in the highest risk patients with acute heart attack or medically unstable angina. "The Topol study suggests a remarkable 60 percent reduction in mortality at three years in this select group treated with ReoPro™ compared with the group treated with placebo," said Dr. Fischman.

While pretreatment with ReoPro™ is highly effective, its average cost is estimated at $1,350 per patient dose. "The cost of this drug should bring significant attention to the question of who should receive it," said Dr. Fischman. "The issue of cost-effectiveness is vital to understanding whether or not ReoPro™ should be used in lower risk patient populations."

Dr. Fischman suggests that further investigation is necessary to address this issue. "Future development of oral agents similar to ReoPro™ promises to further expand the use of these agents to a broader spectrum of patients with ischemic heart disease," he said.

Michael P. Savage, M.D., associate professor of medicine, division of cardiology, Jefferson Medical College, and director of the cardiac catheterization laboratory at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, contributed to the editorial.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Thomas Jefferson University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Thomas Jefferson University. ""Super Aspirin" Holds Long-Term Benefits For Some Patients Who Undergo Balloon Angioplasty." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 August 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/08/970818052751.htm>.
Thomas Jefferson University. (1997, August 18). "Super Aspirin" Holds Long-Term Benefits For Some Patients Who Undergo Balloon Angioplasty. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/08/970818052751.htm
Thomas Jefferson University. ""Super Aspirin" Holds Long-Term Benefits For Some Patients Who Undergo Balloon Angioplasty." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/08/970818052751.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins