Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Insect Research May Produce Better Hearing Aids

Date:
September 1, 1998
Source:
University Of Toronto
Summary:
University of Toronto research into an insect that thrives in rain forests, may help in the development of better hearing aids, microphones and music speakers.

U of T research involving an insect that thrives in rain forests may help in the development of better hearing aids, microphones and music speakers.

A diverse group of insects known as katydids possess extremely complicated ear structures -- located on their two front knees -- and can detect sound frequencies that other animals, including humans, cannot. Professor Glenn Morris of zoology, who has been studying katydids for 30 years, believes their auditory systems could serve as a model for smaller, improved human hearing aids and other acoustic devices.

Morris studies the different notes and frequencies produced by the insect. He then tries to relate these to the shape of the katydids' ear. "Although katydids are an extremely diverse insect group, their ears have evolved to listen to sounds made by their own particular species," he says. Male katydids have a diverse range of frequencies while females are usually mute. "Some frequencies are so amazingly high that not only are people unable to hear them but the insects themselves can't either, unless they're practically sitting side by side." These high frequencies may enable the insects to avoid predators such as bats who might eavesdrop on a male as he sings for a mate, he notes.

Morris, who has studied the katydids of Ecuador, Columbia, Costa Rica, Venezuela and Panama, is currently making working models of the insects' ears to see how they function. The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council is funding his research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Toronto. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Toronto. "Insect Research May Produce Better Hearing Aids." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 September 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980831210659.htm>.
University Of Toronto. (1998, September 1). Insect Research May Produce Better Hearing Aids. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980831210659.htm
University Of Toronto. "Insect Research May Produce Better Hearing Aids." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980831210659.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

AFP (July 24, 2014) America's death penalty debate raged Thursday after it took nearly two hours for Arizona to execute a prisoner who lost a Supreme Court battle challenging the experimental lethal drug cocktail. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

AFP (July 24, 2014) China's elderly population is expanding so quickly that children struggle to look after them, pushing them to do something unexpected in Chinese society- move their parents into a nursing home. Duration: 02:07 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins