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New Study Identifies Specific Ear Problems Resulting From Automobile Airbag Deployment

Date:
September 19, 1998
Source:
American Academy Of Otolaryngology-Head And Neck Surgery
Summary:
According to a number of independent and government studies, automobile airbags have decreased fatalities by 21-22 percent for unbelted drivers and by 9-16 percent for drivers wearing seatbelts. The downside of airbag deployment is the introduction of a new spectrum of injuries. Most are minor, but some can be life threatening. These injuries include eye damage and trauma to the spine, facial nerve and facial skeleton. Of particular interest to the otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeon are injuries to the head and neck area.

San Antonio, TX -- Each year, a countless number of drivers and passengers in motor vehicle accidents survive due to the deployment of the automobile airbag. According to a number of independent and government studies, automobile airbags have decreased fatalities by 21-22 percent for unbelted drivers and by 9-16 percent for drivers wearing seatbelts.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy Of Otolaryngology-Head And Neck Surgery. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy Of Otolaryngology-Head And Neck Surgery. "New Study Identifies Specific Ear Problems Resulting From Automobile Airbag Deployment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 September 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/09/980919121324.htm>.
American Academy Of Otolaryngology-Head And Neck Surgery. (1998, September 19). New Study Identifies Specific Ear Problems Resulting From Automobile Airbag Deployment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/09/980919121324.htm
American Academy Of Otolaryngology-Head And Neck Surgery. "New Study Identifies Specific Ear Problems Resulting From Automobile Airbag Deployment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/09/980919121324.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

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