Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study Shows Gene May Boost Smoking-Related Heart Disease

Date:
April 13, 2000
Source:
University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill
Summary:
A common gene appears to boost the risk of coronary heart disease among smokers, according to a new study of heart disease and heart attack patients in four U.S. communities.

CHAPEL HILL -- A common gene appears to boost the risk of coronary heart disease among smokers, according to a new study of heart disease and heart attack patients in four U.S. communities.

Related Articles


The study, conducted by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health faculty and colleagues at other institutions, found that smokers faced almost twice the risk of heart problems if they carried the gene GSTT1 than if they did not.

A report on the research appears in the April issue of Atherosclerosis, a scientific journal. Authors include Drs. Rongling Li, former postdoctoral fellow; Andrew F. Olshan, associate professor; James S. Pankow, assistant professor; Herman A. Tyroler, professor; Gerardo Heiss, professor; and Lloyd E. Chambless, research associate professor, all of public health at UNC-CH.

Using data collected between 1987 and 1993, scientists studied 14,239 people enrolled in the continuing Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, a federally supported effort to improve understanding of risk factors for heart attacks and strokes. Subjects lived in Forsyth Co., N.C., the northwest suburbs of Minneapolis, Washington County, Md. and Jackson, Miss.

During the period studied, 458 people suffered heart attacks or were newly diagnosed with heart disease, Pankow said. The final sample consisted of 400 cases and 890 others who served as controls.

"Subjects already had been asked about their smoking habits and had provided a blood sample for genetic analysis, and so we looked more closely at those people who had had heart problems," he said. "We found that those who had heart attacks and heart disease were more likely to be smokers, which was nothing new because it agreed with many other studies conducted around the world.

"What was new was that individuals without the gene had about a 60 percent greater risk of heart problems if they smoked and that those with the gene had about a 180 percent greater risk," Pankow said. "Among people who don’t smoke, the gene seems to make no difference in heart disease."

Roughly four of five study subjects carried the GSTT1 gene, which is thought to be important in the body’s ability to process chemicals found in tobacco smoke, he said. The gene already has been linked to some other smoking-related illnesses such as bladder cancer.

"We’ve known for a long time that smoking is bad for the heart, but we don’t fully understand why," Pankow said. "We hope this research will provide some clues."

Others participating in the research were Drs. Eric Boerwinkle and Molly Bray of the University of Texas Health Science Center’s Human Genetics Center, and Gary S. Pittman and Douglas A. Bell of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, N.C. Other collaborating institutions were Johns Hopkins and Wake Forest universities and the universities of Minnesota and Mississippi.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute supported the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill. "Study Shows Gene May Boost Smoking-Related Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 April 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/04/000410091620.htm>.
University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill. (2000, April 13). Study Shows Gene May Boost Smoking-Related Heart Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/04/000410091620.htm
University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill. "Study Shows Gene May Boost Smoking-Related Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/04/000410091620.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Just A Half-Hour Of Lost Sleep Could Lead To Weight Gain

Just A Half-Hour Of Lost Sleep Could Lead To Weight Gain

Newsy (Mar. 6, 2015) A new study found losing just half an hour of sleep could make you gain weight. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Newsy (Mar. 6, 2015) According to a report from the CDC, suicide rates among young women increased from 1994 to 2012 while rates among young men have decreased. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Bupa is hoping to expand in India&apos;s fast-growing health insurance market, once a rule change on foreign investment is implemented. The British private healthcare group&apos;s CEO tells Grace Pascoe why it&apos;s so keen on the new opportunity. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) Liberia&apos;s last Ebola patient has been released, and the country hasn&apos;t recorded a new case in a week. However, fears of another outbreak still exist. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins