Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Glass Researchers Getting A Bead On Liver Cancer

Date:
August 9, 2000
Source:
University Of Missouri-Rolla
Summary:
A method for treating liver cancer with tiny radioactive glass beads, developed by a UMR researcher and a researcher at the University of Missouri-Columbia, has been approved for use in the United States.

A method for treating liver cancer with tiny radioactive glass beads, developed by a UMR researcher and a researcher at the University of Missouri-Columbia, has been approved for use in the United States.

Delbert E. Day, Curators' Professor Emeritus of ceramic engineering at UMR, is the co-inventor of this method. The U.S. Federal Drug Administration approved Day's treatment method for use in the United States in February.

The first patients to be treated with radioactive glass beads, now marketed under the name TheraSphere by MDS Nordion, will take place later this year at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

The treatment consists of injecting millions of tiny, radioactive glass beads into the main artery supplying blood to the liver. The blood carries the beads into the liver, where they deliver localized radiation to malignant cells in liver tumors.

"Healthy tissue is virtually unaffected, the radiation can be safely delivered, and side effects are minimal," Day says.

Microspheres smaller than a strand of hair

The beads, or microspheres, are 15 to 35 microns in diameter -- "about half the thickness of a human hair," Day says. The beads are made from a special aluminosilicate glass that contains yttrium oxide, a rare-earth element. When the glass beads are placed inside a nuclear reactor for serval days, the yttrium becomes radioactive. The radioactive beads are then injected into the liver, where they irradiate the liver for a period of 3-4 weeks, after which they are no longer radioactive but remain in the liver indefinitely.

Day, who joined the UMR faculty in 1961, and co-inventor Gary J. Ehrhardt of the University of Missouri-Columbia, started their research on the glass beads in 1982. Their first patent was granted in 1988, and since that time they have been granted a total of six U.S. patents and eight foreign patents.

Helping bones to heal

More recently, Day has turned his research efforts toward finding new ways for doctors to treat severely broken bones by using glass pins and surgical sutures to treat those breaks.

Day became interested in glass and its countless uses while a student in ceramic engineering at UMR. "I became interested in the properties and many uses of glass as an undergraduate student at UMR," he says. "I took a course in glass and as a result of that class I prepared a paper and presented it in a student speaking contest at an American Ceramic Society meeting. From then on I had an interest in glass research."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Missouri-Rolla. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Missouri-Rolla. "Glass Researchers Getting A Bead On Liver Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 August 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/08/000807072233.htm>.
University Of Missouri-Rolla. (2000, August 9). Glass Researchers Getting A Bead On Liver Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/08/000807072233.htm
University Of Missouri-Rolla. "Glass Researchers Getting A Bead On Liver Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/08/000807072233.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ramen Health Risks: The Dark Side of the Noodle

Ramen Health Risks: The Dark Side of the Noodle

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) South Koreans eat more instant ramen noodles per capita than anywhere else in the world. But American researchers say eating too much may increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 20, 2014) A patient who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus is in isolation at the Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins