Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

In Largest Comparison Ever Between Human And Mouse Genomes, Scientists Spotlight Parental Competition

Date:
November 16, 2000
Source:
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Summary:
Do you love Mom or Dad's genes best? It depends, scientists say, on the gene. In the biggest comparison between human and mouse DNA sequence to date, researchers from Johns Hopkins and the Whitehead Institute examine how organisms play favorites between their parents' genes, a phenomenon known as imprinting.

Do you love Mom or Dad's genes best? It depends, scientists say, on the gene. In the biggest comparison between human and mouse DNA sequence to date, researchers from Johns Hopkins and the Whitehead Institute examine how organisms play favorites between their parents' genes, a phenomenon known as imprinting.

Related Articles


For most genes, the human genome does not actively distinguish between the copy inherited from the mother and the one from the father. Imprinted genes, however, are especially 'marked' so that one parent's copy virtually shuts down in deference to the other. In theory, imprinting represents competition between Mom and Dad over your genes: Mom turns a certain gene on and Dad turns it off, or vice versa. Yet despite the recent discovery that entire genome regions can be imprinted, scientists understand relatively little about the marking process for imprinted genes.

In this month's issue of Genome Research, Andy Feinberg and colleagues compare a large imprinted region in the human genome with its counterpart in the mouse genome. Covering 1 million adjacent base pairs, the comparison is the largest between humans and their mammalian relatives to date. The experiment successfully revealed all genes in the region and, more importantly, identified 82 non-gene DNA sequences that are similar between mouse and human. These segments are likely to be crucial genetic elements that control gene activity and constitute imprinting marks for this region. As discussed by Feinberg and colleagues, these results provide the first global view of an entire imprinted region in any genome.

In a related Genome Research study, Randy Jirtle and colleagues from Duke University have discovered a new pair of imprinted genes on human chromosome 14, called DLK1 and GTL2. These neighboring genes are "reciprocally" imprinted - that is, they interact so that you activate only your father's copy of DLK1 and only your mother's copy of GTL2. The structure and arrangement of this two-gene cluster is astonishingly similar to a similar cluster on chromosome 11, IGF2/H19, lately prominent in scientific news. The discovery indicates a common mechanism for reciprocal imprinting that may be used throughout the genome and across mammalian species.

Finally, in this issue, a commentary by Andy Hoffman and Thanh Vu from Stanford University discusses the importance of the Feinberg and Jirtle studies to the field of imprinting research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. "In Largest Comparison Ever Between Human And Mouse Genomes, Scientists Spotlight Parental Competition." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 November 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001113235743.htm>.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. (2000, November 16). In Largest Comparison Ever Between Human And Mouse Genomes, Scientists Spotlight Parental Competition. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001113235743.htm
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. "In Largest Comparison Ever Between Human And Mouse Genomes, Scientists Spotlight Parental Competition." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001113235743.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins