Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers Discover Weight-Loss Compound That Doesn’t Affect Food Intake

Date:
February 9, 2001
Source:
Whitehead Institute For Biomedical Research
Summary:
Researchers from the Whitehead Institute and Genset Corporation have found a new compound that controls weight gain in obese mice without affecting their food intake. The compound, called gAcrp30 and administered in daily low doses, caused profound and sustained weight loss in chubby mice eating a cafeteria diet—meals high in fat and sugar and available in unlimited quantities.

Researchers from the Whitehead Institute and Genset Corporation have found a new compound that controls weight gain in obese mice without affecting their food intake. The compound, called gAcrp30 and administered in daily low doses, caused profound and sustained weight loss in chubby mice eating a cafeteria diet—meals high in fat and sugar and available in unlimited quantities. Continuing the low daily doses allowed the mice to keep the weight off over a sustained period of time despite their fattening diet. The results will be published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science on February 6 on the web and on February 13 in print.

"The human gAcrp30 protein was used in these mouse studies," says Harvey Lodish, Member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and lead author of the paper, "but much further research is needed to determine whether this substance can be used in man as an aid in weight loss. Such a therapy is urgently needed by the many thousands of obese patients who suffer from many related health problems such as diabetes,"

Humans have developed a very efficient mechanism to store fat—a survival mechanism that allowed our hunter-gatherer ancestors to withstand long periods of time without food. However, this boon has become a curse for us in modern times, with our constant, abundant food supply. Food is broken down in our intestines to form free fatty acids, which are then absorbed by the body and circulate in the blood. When we don’t expend energy the free fatty acids can be stored for the long term as fat or converted to sugar and stored for short-term use as glycogen About five years ago, researchers from Harvey Lodish’s lab cloned a protein secreted only by fat cells. Called Acrp30, this protein was suspected to be a hormone, but not much was known about its function. The protein was patented by Whitehead Institute and licensed to Genset in 1999. Over the past year, researchers at Whitehead Institute and Genset discovered that one particular fragment of Acrp30, called gAcrp30, is naturally produced by the body and works in a completely different manner compared to most available weight-loss agents.

Most weight-loss drugs work by either preventing the body from absorbing fatty acids in the intestine or inhibiting the break down of fatty acids so they are excreted from the body rather than get stored as fat. In contrast, the gAcrp30 circulates in blood and causes muscle to burn fatty acids faster so they are not stored as fat. The result is weight-loss without the complications of having fatty acid pass through the body. This is especially significant since 25% of our weight is muscle, making muscle quantitatively the most important tissue to remove fatty acid from the blood circulation and use it for energy.

The mice treated with gAcrp30 showed significantly reduced levels of free fatty acids as well as decreased glucose and triglyceride levels in their blood despite their high-fat diet. Even treated mice that were directly injected with fat showed these lowered levels indicating that the protein rids the body of fatty acids without interfering with intestinal absorption.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Whitehead Institute For Biomedical Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Whitehead Institute For Biomedical Research. "Researchers Discover Weight-Loss Compound That Doesn’t Affect Food Intake." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 February 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010207073459.htm>.
Whitehead Institute For Biomedical Research. (2001, February 9). Researchers Discover Weight-Loss Compound That Doesn’t Affect Food Intake. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010207073459.htm
Whitehead Institute For Biomedical Research. "Researchers Discover Weight-Loss Compound That Doesn’t Affect Food Intake." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010207073459.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins