Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Recently-Discovered Protein Could Be Key To Understanding And Preventing Type-2 Diabetes, Yale Researchers Find

Date:
June 6, 2001
Source:
Yale University
Summary:
A protein called Akt2 or Protein Kinase B plays an important role in maintaining glucose balance, possibly leading to a drug target for preventing Type-2 diabetes, Yale researchers report in a study published in the June 1 issue of Science.

New Haven, Conn. -- A protein called Akt2 or Protein Kinase B plays an important role in maintaining glucose balance, possibly leading to a drug target for preventing Type-2 diabetes, Yale researchers report in a study published in the June 1 issue of Science.

"When we inactivated the Akt2 protein in study mice, we found that these mice had defects in insulin's action in liver and skeletal muscle, suggesting that Akt2 plays an important role in insulin signaling and action," said Jason Kim, an author on the study and a research scientist in the Department of Internal Medicine at Yale School of Medicine.

"We also found that this defect in liver and skeletal muscle insulin action altered whole body glucose homeostasis, suggesting that Akt2 might have a role in the development of diabetes," Kim added.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in the world, affecting 120 million people. Insulin resistance plays a primary role in the development of the disease. Kim said diabetes research is now focused on understanding how insulin acts in the body, especially in the area of the insulin signaling pathway. Insulin acts by binding to a receptor that activates a cascade of proteins that are both known and unknown, causing the cells to increase glucose use. The role of the Akt2 protein had been uncertain until co-authors at the University of Pennsylvania provided lab-generated mice with inactivation of the Akt2 protein.

"These mice develop diabetes in a pattern similar to human diabetes and future studies will examine whether a mutation in the Akt2 protein is also seen in people with diabetes," said Kim who is also an associate at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a co-director of NIH-Yale Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Center. "A defect in this protein in humans can explain how diabetes develops."

Other authors on the study included Gerald I. Shulman, M.D. of Yale; Han Cho, Joanne L. Thorvaldsen, Qingwei Chu, E. Bryan Crenshaw III, Klaus H. Kaestner and Morris J. Birnbaum of the University of Pennsylvania; and Marisa S. Bartolomei of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of Pennsylvania.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Yale University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Yale University. "Recently-Discovered Protein Could Be Key To Understanding And Preventing Type-2 Diabetes, Yale Researchers Find." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 June 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010605073031.htm>.
Yale University. (2001, June 6). Recently-Discovered Protein Could Be Key To Understanding And Preventing Type-2 Diabetes, Yale Researchers Find. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010605073031.htm
Yale University. "Recently-Discovered Protein Could Be Key To Understanding And Preventing Type-2 Diabetes, Yale Researchers Find." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010605073031.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) Now that the U.S. is restricting travel from West Africa, some are dropping questions about a travel ban and instead asking about visa bans. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
US to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

US to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) Stepping up their vigilance against Ebola, federal authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the US from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Help Paralysed Man Walk Again, Patient in Disbelief

Doctors Help Paralysed Man Walk Again, Patient in Disbelief

AFP (Oct. 22, 2014) Polish doctors describe how they helped a paralysed man walk again, with the patient in disbelief at the return of sensation to his legs. Duration: 1:04 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins